U.S. Geological Survey Releases Study on Manmade Earthquakes

For Immediate Release

Jonathon Berman, (202) 495-3033, jonathon.berman@sierraclub.org

U.S. Geological Survey Releases Study on Manmade Earthquakes

Map Highlights Dangers of Wastewater Injection Associated with the Fracking Process to Communities

WASHINGTON - Today, for the first time ever, the U.S. Geological Survey released a study identifying the location of manmade earthquake hazards. Previously, the agency has only released reports noting natural earthquake threats.

This report come shortly after the Sierra Club and Public Justice filed a federal lawsuit against three energy companies engaged in hydraulic fracturing in Oklahoma. The suit alleges that wastewater from fracking and oil production has contributed significantly to the alarming increase in earthquake activity.

Oklahoma has seen a rapid increase in earthquakes registering at or above a 3.0 magnitude per year, with 109 in 2013, 585 in 2014, and over 900 in 2015.

In response, Director of Sierra Club’s Our Wild America campaign Dan Chu released the following statement:

“Today’s report once again highlights the dangers the fracking cycle poses to our communities.

“The world is already experiencing deadly storms, droughts, and erratic climate and weather extremes due to climate change, and the rapid increase in earthquakes caused by wastewater injections from the oil and gas industry only raises the threat to communities across the country.”


The Sierra Club is the oldest and largest grassroots environmental organization in the United States. It was founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known conservationist and preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. The Sierra Club has hundreds of thousands of members in chapters located throughout the US, and is affiliated with Sierra Club Canada.

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