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Monday, January 14, 2008
In Defending War Vote, Clintons Contradict Record
WASHINGTON - Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton have repeatedly invoked the name of Senator Chuck Hagel, a longtime critic of the Iraq war, as they defend Mrs. Clinton's 2002 vote to authorize the war. In interviews and at a recent campaign event, they have said that Mr. Hagel, Republican of Nebraska...
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Joint Chiefs Chairman: Close Guantanamo
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - The chief of the U.S. military said he favors closing the prison here as soon as possible because he believes negative publicity worldwide about treatment of terrorist suspects has been ``pretty damaging'' to the image of the United States. ``I'd like to see it...
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Iraq: Awoken to a New Danger
BAGHDAD - The newly formed 'Awakening' forces set up by the U.S. military are bringing new conflict among people. For months now the U.S. military has been actively building what it calls 'Awakening' forces and "concerned local citizens" in an effort to reduce attacks on occupation forces. Members...
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Pakistan: Food Shortages Dim Public Enthusiasm For Polls
KARACHI - While the drawing rooms of Pakistan's rich and powerful are abuzz with speculations on who killed Benazir Bhutto, and whether or not the elections in February are going to be free and fair, the question on the minds of most ordinary people is how to get their daily bread. With prices of...
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Waterboarding: Intelligence Chief Says, 'For Me It Would Be Torture'
The US head of intelligence has said that the practice of "waterboarding" in interrogations "would be torture" if the subject was forced to take water into his lungs. But Mike McConnell, in a magazine interview, declined for legal reasons to say whether it categorically should be considered torture...
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Traumatised Veterans 'Have Killed 120 in US'
While public anger is directed at the Pentagon for sending American soldiers ill-prepared to fight in Iraq, an equally troubling problem is rearing its head at home. Military veterans are returning from the war zone just as ill-prepared for civilian life and dozens suffering from post-traumatic...
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Ending A Journey: Walk For Impeachment Reaches Goal, But Fight Not Over
WASHINGTON - John Nirenberg took his last step in a 40-day walk Saturday. But he described it as his first - vowing in his characteristic quietness to push forward with the promotion of impeachment. He and about 14 supporters embarked on the final leg of a 480-mile walk between Boston and...
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Sunday, January 13, 2008
U.S. Corporate Elite Fear Candidate Edwards
WASHINGTON - Ask corporate lobbyists which presidential contender is most feared by their clients and the answer is almost always the same -- Democrat John Edwards. The former North Carolina senator's chosen profession alone raises the hackles of business people. Before entering politics, he made a...
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Saturday, January 12, 2008
In Voiding Suit, Appellate Court Says Torture is to be Expected
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court Friday threw out a suit by four British Muslims who allege that they were tortured and subjected to religious abuse in the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, a ruling that exonerated 11 present and former senior Pentagon officials. It appeared to be...
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Racial Tensions Roil Democratic Race
A series of comments from Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, her husband and her supporters are spurring a racial backlash and adding a divisive edge to the presidential primary as the candidates head south to heavily African-American South Carolina. The comments, which ranged from the New York senator...
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Iraqi Civilian Deaths Massive by Any Measure
UNITED NATIONS - How many Iraqi civilians have lost their lives as a result of gunshots and bombings since the U.S. military invaded that oil-rich Arab nation nearly five years ago? Credible estimates for the period March 2003 until June 2006 have ranged from a high of 600,000 to about 47,000. The...
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Iraq Less Violent But Not Less Hellish
FALLUJAH - U.S. and Iraqi officials claim that security is improving across al-Anbar province and much of Iraq. Security during the last half of 2007 was indeed better than in the period between February 2006 and mid-2007. But this has brought little solace to many Iraqis, because violence is still...
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Friday, January 11, 2008
Pakistan Warns US Not to Enter Northwest
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - President Pervez Musharraf warned that U.S. troops would be regarded as invaders if they crossed into Pakistan's border region with Afghanistan in the hunt for al-Qaida or Taliban militants, according to an interview published Friday. Musharraf, whose popularity has plummeted...
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On Anniversary, Views of Surge Diverge
WASHINGTON - Exactly one year after U.S. President George W. Bush announced that he would significantly increase the number of troops deployed to Iraq, the wisdom of his so-called "surge" strategy remains very much in dispute here. While even many Democrats, who have sought in vain to reverse the...
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2 Freed Colombian Hostages Thank Chavez
CARACAS - Two high-profile hostages freed by Colombian rebels Thursday after six years in captivity thanked Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez for arranging their freedom and joined in a jubilant reunion at the presidential palace. Former Colombian vice presidential candidate Clara Rojas and former...
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World Warming Despite Cool Pacific and Baghdad Snow
OSLO - Climate change is still nudging up temperatures in the long term even though the warmest year was back in 1998 and 2008 has begun with unusual weather such as a cool Pacific and Baghdad's first snow in memory, experts said. "Global warming has not stopped," said Amir Delju, senior scientific...
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UN Remains Impotent as Captive of US
UNITED NATIONS - As Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon begins his second year in office, he has refused to claim any tangible successes during 2007, nor has he laid out any clear-cut strategy to meet the political and economic challenges facing the United Nations in 2008. "So far his performance and...
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Abu Ghraib Officer: Probe Was Incomplete
BALTIMORE -- The revelation that the Army threw out the conviction of the only officer court-martialed in the Abu Ghraib scandal renewed outrage from human rights advocates who complained that not enough military and civilian leaders were held accountable for the abuse of Iraqi prisoners. Those...
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Protests Mark 6 Years of Guantanamo
NEW YORK - Human rights activists will lead rallies across the United States today to build pressure on the Bush administration and Congress to end the detention of foreign prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay military camp. From Washington, DC to Boise, Idaho, civil libertarians plan to hold more than...
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Protesters Disrupt Vermont Governor's State of the State Address
MONTPELIER - A small group of war protesters briefly stole center stage at Gov. James Douglas' State of the State address Thursday afternoon. Minutes into the governor's speech, the protesters, who included high school students, unfurled banners bearing anti-war slogans.The contingent of about 10...
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Official Version of Naval Incident Starts to Unravel
WASHINGTON - Despite the official and media portrayal of the incident in the Strait of Hormuz early Monday morning as a serious threat to U.S. ships from Iranian speedboats that nearly resulted in a "battle at sea", new information over the past three days suggests that the incident did not involve...
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Thursday, January 10, 2008
Ashcroft Deal Brings Scrutiny in Justice Dept.
WASHINGTON - When the top federal prosecutor in New Jersey needed to find an outside lawyer to monitor a large corporation willing to settle criminal charges out of court last fall, he turned to former Attorney General John Ashcroft, his onetime boss. With no public notice and no bidding, the...
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Report Finds Rising Tide of Green Financing
BROOKLIN, Canada - There appears to be hope for the planet yet. After much urging and dire threats, the global economy, much like a stubborn and temperamental toddler, is starting to reluctantly turn towards sustainability, according to the "State of the World 2008" report released by the...
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Britain to Build New Nuclear Power Plants
The British Labour government Thursday gave the green light for the construction of a new generation of nuclear power plants which it claimed would safeguard energy supplies while meeting the challenges of climate change. The controversial plan, presented to parliament in a White Paper Thursday,...
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Oilsands Producers Get Failing Grade on Environment
A new report card has given a failing grade to nine of 10 Alberta oilsands producers on their environmental performance. The study by the Pembina Institute and the World Wildlife Fund ranked 10 operating and proposed oilsands mines on 20 different environmental indicators, including environmental...
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Ex-CIA Official May Refuse To Testify About Videotapes
A former CIA official at the center of the controversy over destroyed interrogation videotapes has been blocked by Justice Department officials from gaining access to government records about the incident, according to sources familiar with the case. The former official, Jose Rodriguez Jr., has...
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Evolutionists At War Over Altruism's Origins
An intellectual war of words has broken out between two of the world's leading evolutionists. Oxford University's Richard Dawkins and Harvard's Edward Wilson have gone head to head over the evolution of altruism in the animal kingdom, and whether it can have come about as a result of something...
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Iraq: Fuel Crisis Freezes Life
BAQUBA - It's turning out to be about the hardest winter Abu Muslih has known. Too often it's a choice between buying food and medicines, and buying kerosene to keep his children warm. "I see them feeling cold, so I go out to buy kerosene at any price," Muslih, a 49-year-old city employee told IPS...
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Kucinich Undaunted by Fifth-Place Showing
DOVER - Dennis Kucinich's fifth-place showing in Tuesday's primary won't mean much to his presidential bid, as he vowed to continue campaigning across the country for the Democratic nomination despite capturing a low percentage of the New Hampshire vote. With 99 percent of precincts reporting, the...
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2005 Use of Gas by Blackwater Leaves Questions
The helicopter was hovering over a Baghdad checkpoint into the Green Zone, one typically crowded with cars, Iraqi civilians and United States military personnel. Suddenly, on that May day in 2005, the copter dropped CS gas, a riot-control substance the American military in Iraq can use only under...
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Wednesday, January 9, 2008
Judge Won't Inquire Into CIA Tapes Case
A federal judge refused on Wednesday to delve into the destruction of CIA interrogation videos, saying there was no evidence the Bush administration violated a court order and the Justice Department deserved time to conduct its own investigation. The decision by U.S. District Judge Henry H. Kennedy...
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The Afghanistan Surge
Defense officials aren't calling it a surge, but it sure looks like one. The Pentagon is poised to send more than 3,000 additional troops to Afghanistan -- all of them Marines, ABC News has learned. The plan is a sign that things are not going well in Afghanistan. Commanders say they simply do not...
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AT&T and Other ISPs May Be Getting Ready to Filter
For the past fifteen years, Internet service providers have acted - to use an old cliche - as wide-open information super-highways, letting data flow uninterrupted and unimpeded between users and the Internet. But ISPs may be about to embrace a new metaphor: traffic cop. At a small panel discussion...
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House Launches FCC Investigation; Warns Against Destroying Documents
As promised, the House Energy & Commerce Committee launched a formal investigation into the Federal Communications Commission's "regulatory procedures and practices." The committee was following up on a Dec. 3 letter asking the chairman about procedural criticisms. Committee leaders advised...
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CIA Whistle-Blower Philip Agee Dies in Cuba
HAVANA - Philip Agee, a former CIA spy who exposed its undercover operations in Latin America in a 1975 book, died in Havana, the Cuban Communist Party newspaper Granma said on Wednesday. Agee, 72, died on Monday night, the newspaper said, calling him a "loyal friend of Cuba and staunch defender of...
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Hundreds of Iraqi Interpreters Denied Chance to Live in UK
Hundreds of Iraqi interpreters employed by the British Armed Forces in Iraq are being rejected after applying to live in Britain for their own safety. Out of 700 who have now applied through the Ministry of Defence for the special settlement scheme announced by the Government last year, 300 have...
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FCC to Probe Comcast Data Discrimination
The Federal Communications Commission will investigate complaints that Comcast Corp. actively interferes with Internet traffic as its subscribers try to share files online, FCC Chairman Kevin Martin said Tuesday. A coalition of consumer groups and legal scholars asked the agency in November to stop...
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US Diplomats Critical of Bush Iraq Policy-Survey
WASHINGTON - Nearly half of U.S. diplomats who do not want to serve in Iraq say a key reason is because they do not support the Bush administration's policies there, according to a union survey released on Tuesday. The survey by the American Foreign Service Association, which represents the rank-...
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Shell and Total Square Up Over Gasfield in Iraq's Sunni Heartland
Shell and Total are vying to develop a huge gasfield in what was Iraq's most violent province as a source for exports to Europe. The Iraqi Government held talks with a number of potential companies last week regarding development of the Akkas field in Anbar province, northwest of Baghdad. Akkas,...
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Introducing The iTaser: MP3 Player Meets Hip, Portable Shock Device
Deborah Kerr in The King and I recommended whistling a happy tune when afraid, but now fearful Americans can sing along to their favourite tracks while shooting anyone who causes them consternation with a 50,000-volt electric charge. The annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, which is...
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White House Ordered to Say Whether Missing E-mails Were Stored
WASHINGTON - A federal magistrate ordered the White House yesterday to reveal whether copies of possibly millions of missing e-mails are stored in computer backup files. The order by US Magistrate Judge John Facciola comes amid an effort by the White House to scuttle two lawsuits that could force...
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Did Racist Voters Cost Obama The Primary?
It seems strange to be looking for the reasons for Barack Obama's shock defeat in the New Hampshire primary. Just a few weeks ago Hillary Clinton was the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination to contest the presidential election but that was before the Illinois senator stormed to victory in the...
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Report Reveals Vietnam War Hoaxes, Faked Attacks
North Vietnamese made hoax calls to get the US military to bomb its own units during the Vietnam War, according to declassified information that also confirmed US officials faked an incident to escalate the war. The report was released by the National Security Agency, responsible for much of the...
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Tuesday, January 8, 2008
Clinton Allies May Dump Millions Into Anti-Obama Group
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- A panicked and cash-short Clinton campaign is seriously considering giving up on the Nevada caucuses and on the South Carolina primary in order to regroup and to save resources for the massive 19-state mega-primary on February 5. At the same time, some top independent...
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Rights Groups Urge International Efforts for Kenya
UNITED NATIONS - Amid fears that ongoing violence could take many more human lives in Kenya, rights activists are calling for the government in Nairobi to allow an independent investigation of the presidential poll results. "Mounting evidence of serious election fraud has helped ignite violence...
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Court Revives Lawsuit Against No Child Left Behind Law
A federal appeals court on Monday revived a legal challenge to the federal No Child Left Behind education law, saying that school districts have been justified in complaining that the law required them to pay for testing and other programs without providing sufficient federal money. The 2-to-1...
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Abused Immigrant Spouses May Face Deportation
U.S. rethinks its policy of letting them remain here in certain cases.
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France Best, US Worst in Preventable Death Ranking
WASHINGTON - France, Japan and Australia rated best and the United States worst in new rankings focusing on preventable deaths due to treatable conditions in 19 leading industrialized nations, researchers said on Tuesday. If the U.S. health care system performed as well as those of those top three...
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US Groups Sue Shell Over Refinery Pollution
WASHINGTON - U.S. environmentalists took Shell Oil Co. and several of its affiliates to court Monday in a bid to stop pollution from a refining and chemicals plant in the southwestern state of Texas. The Sierra Club and Environment Texas want a federal judge to order Shell to cease alleged...
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Call to Keep Water Clean of Privatisation
BRUSSELS - Water supply could increasingly be managed by private firms once a new European Union treaty enters into force, experts warned Monday. Delivery of drinking water from the tap is mostly controlled by public utilities in the EU, but fears are being voiced that new policies promoting...
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ACLU Rips Plan to Track R.I. Students
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - A tech company with ties to a school district plans to test a tracking system by putting computer chips on grade-schoolers' backpacks, an experiment the ACLU ripped Monday as invasive and unnecessary.The pilot program set to start next week in the Middletown school district would...
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Clinton's Civil Rights Lesson
DOVER, N.H. - As they barnstorm through New Hampshire, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton and her husband are often introduced by supporters who once backed another candidate but converted to her cause. Today, in Dover, Francine Torge, a former John Edwards supporter, said this while introducing Mrs...
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Monday, January 7, 2008
Musharraf: Bhutto to Blame for Her Assassination
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan - Former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's assassination was her own fault, the country's president, Pervez Musharraf, said in an interview on U.S. television. "For standing up outside the car, I think it was she to blame alone -- nobody else. Responsibility is hers,"...
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Pakistanis See US as Greatest Threat
WASHINGTON - Amid reports that the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush is considering aggressive covert actions against armed Islamist forces in western Pakistan, a new survey released here Monday suggested that such an effort would be opposed by an overwhelming majority of Pakistanis...
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Voter ID Laws Are Set to Face a Crucial Test
INDIANAPOLIS - In April 2006, a federal judge upheld Indiana's law on voter identification, the strictest in the nation, saying there was no evidence that it would prevent any voter from having his ballot counted. But on Election Day last November, Valerie Williams became that evidence, according...
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Racial Disparities Persist in US Cancer Treatment
WASHINGTON - U.S. blacks continue to get inferior cancer treatment compared to whites, researchers said on Monday in a study showing that disparities first documented in the early 1990s persist despite efforts to erase them. The researchers assessed the type of treatment given to more than 143,000...
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For Pentagon and News Media, Relations Improve With a Shift in War Coverage
WASHINGTON - The anguished relationship between the military and the news media appears to be on the mend as battlefield successes from the troop increase in Iraq are reflected in more upbeat news coverage. Efforts from the new Pentagon leadership, as well as by top commanders at the headquarters...
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Iranian Boats "Provoke" US Navy Ships in Hormuz: CNN
WASHINGTON -- Five Iranian Revolutionary Guard boats harassed and provoked three U.S. Navy ships in the Strait of Hormuz, a major oil shipping route off the Iranian coast, over the weekend, CNN reported on Monday. Citing unidentified U.S. officials, CNN said the Iranian vessels came within 200...
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Killer of US Soldiers Becomes a Hero, Exposes Underlying Tensions
BAGHDAD - The recent killing of two U.S. soldiers by their Iraqi colleague has raised disturbing questions about U.S. military relations with the Iraqis they work with. On Dec. 26, an Iraqi soldier opened fire on U.S. soldiers accompanying him during a joint military patrol in the northern Iraqi...
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Israel Seeks Ban on Settlement Report Ahead of Bush Visit
JERUSALEM - The Israeli government is seeking a court ban on the publication of a key report on settlements, a peace group said on Monday, just days before US President George W. Bush begins his landmark visit. In response to a court petition for the state report to be made public, the defence...
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Sunday, January 6, 2008
US Military Not Welcome in Pakistan: Army
ISLAMABAD - The Pakistani military reacted angrily Sunday to reports that US President George W. Bush is considering covert military operations in the country's volatile tribal areas bordering Afghanistan. "It is not up to the US administration, it is Pakistan's government who is responsible for...
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Court to Consider Execution by Lethal Injection
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court, in a case being watched around the world, on Monday hears arguments about whether to ban the lethal three-drug cocktail used in most U.S. executions because it inflicts excruciating pain. The hour-long session marks the first time in more than a century the court has...
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Gaza Outages Expand After Fuel Cutbacks
As Winter Sets In, Electricity Goes Off For Civilians
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SDS: One Generation Got Old, One Generation Got Soul
Sixteen students sat around a table in the Manhattan cafeteria of the New School discussing where commas should go. They were rewriting, for the third time, a mission statement for their chapter of Students for a Democratic Society, the activist group that had been dormant for nearly 40 years. They...
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Will CIA Tape Investigation Dig Deep Enough?
WASHINGTON - A U.S. probe into the CIA's destruction of interrogation videotapes is a chance to examine the legality of harsh techniques used on terrorism suspects, but investigators may not take the opportunity. U.S. Justice Department officials say the inquiry is intended to focus on the tapes'...
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Former US Presidential Candidate Urges Bush's Impeachment
WASHINGTON - Former US presidential candidate George McGovern on Sunday called for President George W. Bush and Vice President Richard Cheney to be impeached, saying the case for such a dramatic step "is far stronger" than it was against former disgraced president Richard Nixon. A former US...
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Saturday, January 5, 2008
UC Berkeley Lawyer Who Justified Torture of Detainees Sued
A man who was held in isolation for more than three years before being tried and convicted of aiding terrorists filed suit Friday against the UC Berkeley law professor and former Justice Department official whose memos justified inflicting physical and mental pain during interrogations. Military...
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Congressional Hopefuls Applaud Maine Congressman For Impeachment Call
PORTLAND - Two Democratic congressional candidates from southern Maine are applauding Rep. Mike Michaud for calling for impeachment hearings on Vice President Dick Cheney. In a letter sent last month, Michaud, D-Maine, urged House Judiciary Chairman John Conyers to schedule impeachment hearings...
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Hillary Booed at NH Democratic Party Dinner
If the New Hampshire Democratic Party's 100 Club dinner is any bell weather - Barack Obama will handily win here. When Obama, the dinner's last speaker, took the stage the crowd surged forward chanting "O-bam-a" and "Fired Up, Ready to Go!" So many people pressed toward the stage that an announcer...
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It's My Party: I'll Taser if I Want To
Marketing Tactic Jolting Sales of Self-Defense Item
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'Skinny Kid with a Funny Name' Reshapes US Politics
"They said this day would never come," said the Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama at the outset of his barnstorming victory speech on Thursday night. But as he arrived in New Hampshire early yesterday, Americans woke up to the historic possibility that the day when they might have a...
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Friday, January 4, 2008
Call to Boycott Slave Children Cotton
MOSCOW - A group of civil society activists has called for immediate boycott of Uzbek cotton produced by forced child labour. Unlike other developing countries, they say, child labour in the cotton sector of Uzbekistan is not the result of poverty but of a coercion policy adopted by the central...
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Foreign TV News Fell to Pre-9/11 Levels in 2007
WASHINGTON- With the exception of the Iraq war, foreign news coverage by the three major U.S. television networks declined significantly in 2007, according to the latest annual review by the authoritative Tyndall Report.Indeed, the foreign news bureaus of the three networks, ABC, CBS, and NBC, had...
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Jungle Tribal Leader Kelesau Naan Took on The Loggers. It May Have Cost Him His Life
Kelesau Naan never went to school. He signed his name with a thumb print and spent his entire life living in the jungles of Borneo. But among his tribe, the Penan, he was a visionary and an inspiration. For years, he had organised his people in a desperate defence of their home and heritage: the...
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National Academy of Scientists Defends the Teaching of Evolution
Creationism confuses students about what constitutes science, a report says, and it should not be taught.
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Burning Biofuels May Be Worse Than Coal and Oil, say Experts
Using biofuels made from corn, sugar cane and soy could have a greater environmental impact than burning fossil fuels, according to experts. Although the fuels themselves emit fewer greenhouse gases, they all have higher costs in terms of biodiversity loss and destruction of farmland. The problems...
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Groups Seek to Stop Relicensing of Nuclear Plants
HOUSTON - A coalition of East Coast environmental and anti-nuclear groups filed a petition with U.S. regulators on Thursday to suspend all pending relicensing efforts by nuclear reactors in the United States. A coalition called Stop the Relicensing of Oyster Creek joined with Riverkeeper to...
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Navy Must Cut Sonar Use off California
A federal judge in Los Angeles on Thursday ordered the toughest set of restrictions ever imposed on the U.S. Navy's use of mid-frequency sonar off the Southern California coast as part of a protracted court battle to protect whales and other marine mammals from underwater sonic blasts. The order...
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Cloned Livestock Poised To Receive FDA Clearance
Get ready for a food fight over milk and meat from cloned animals and their offspring.After more than six years of wrestling with the question of whether meat and milk from them are safe to eat, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to declare as early as next week that they are. The FDA had...
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2003 Letter Told CIA: Trashing Tapes Would Harm Image
WASHINGTON -- More than two years before the CIA destroyed interrogation videotapes, top officials were urged to preserve them by a senior lawmaker who warned that disposing of the recordings would "reflect badly on the agency." The warning came in a February 2003 letter from Rep. Jane Harman of...
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Clinton Campaign Stung By Third-Place Finish
Des Moines - After a stunning defeat and finishing third in Thursday night's Democratic caucuses, Senator Hillary Clinton congratulated Barack Obama and John Edwards, and vowed to jumpstart her national campaign and win her party's nomination for president. "I am ready as I can be," Clinton told a...
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Thursday, January 3, 2008
Jamie Oliver Campaigns For Chicken Welfare
Two of Britain's best-known chefs are mounting a campaign to persuade people not to eat battery-reared chickens. Jamie Oliver has made a television programme on the appalling conditions in which many of the birds live and hopes to encourage supermarkets to invest in better-treated birds such as...
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Talk Show Icon Phil Donahue Fights for Soldier
"We're all very pumped," Phil Donahue says over the phone. "We're all wired and we have no idea what's in store." The talk show-icon-turned-director is brimming with excitement over his debut film, "Body of War," being screened this weekend at the Palm Springs International Film Festival. The anti-...
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The Iowa Caucuses: Five Not-So-Unlikely Surprises
The smart money - not to mention the latest polls - gives an edge to Barack Obama and Mike Huckabee in tonight's Iowa caucuses.But take a couple hundred thousand Midwesterners, pack them into gyms and libraries and town halls on a frigid Iowa night, add a heaping measure of peer pressure to the equation, and, well, anything can happen. Here are five unlikely results you that shouldn't be shocked to see when the final precinct tallies come in: 1) John Edwards Wins Going Away
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French Activist Bove Launches Anti-GMO Hunger Strike
PARIS - French radical farmer Jose Bove, who became a worldwide celebrity for his fight against junk food, went on a hunger strike from Thursday to try and get the government to do more to ban genetically modified (GMO) crops. Speaking on RTL radio, Bove said he had only been drinking water since...
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16 States Sue EPA to Force Waiver Over Greenhouse Gas Emissions
California led 15 other states and five environmental groups into federal court Wednesday to challenge the Bush administration's refusal to let the state limit vehicle emissions of gases that contribute to global warming. In a lawsuit filed in San Francisco, the state accused the Environmental...
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Candidates Scored on AIDS Policies
NEW YORK - Hundreds of activists gathered in Iowa this week urging voters to reject presidential candidates who do not support enhanced global efforts to fight HIV/AIDS. In the final run up to the primaries, activists supported by Africa Action, an influential advocacy group, distributed thousands...
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Ruling Gives Human Rights Groups Protections of Press
A federal judge has ruled that Amnesty International and other human rights groups can assert the same privileges that journalists use, allowing them to better protect anonymous sources. The magistrate judge, Viktor Pohorelsky of Federal District Court in New York, said in an order issued Tuesday...
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Terror Prosecutions Shed More Heat Than Light
NEW YORK - The U.S. government's spotty record in obtaining convictions of people charged with providing "material support" to terrorist organisations is adding new impetus to the efforts of prominent constitutional lawyers to seek substantial changes in the law. The latest failure in a terrorism-...
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Mexican Farmers Protest NAFTA
The last tariffs on U.S. produce end, raising fears of a glut of cheap corn and beans wiping out local agriculture.
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Rice and Gates Divided over Iran's Role in Iraq
WASHINGTON - A State Department official's assertion in late December that Iran had exerted a restraining influence on Iraqi Shiite militia violence signaled a major divergence of views between Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Secretary of Defence Robert Gates over how to portray Iran's role...
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US Admissions of Iraqi Refugees Fall Far Short of Bush Administration Goal
WASHINGTON - US admissions of Iraqi refugees are nose-diving amid bureaucratic in-fighting despite the Bush administration's pledge to boost them to roughly 1,000 per month, according to State Department statistics obtained by the Associated Press. For the third straight month since the United...
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Alaskan Sea Drilling Plans Condemned
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - The federal government will open up nearly 46,000 square miles off Alaska's northwest coast to petroleum leases next month, a decision condemned by enviromental groups that contend the industrial activity will harm northern marine mammals. The Minerals Management Agency...
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Wednesday, January 2, 2008
Justice Dept. Launches Criminal Probe of CIA Tapes
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Justice Department said on Wednesday it had launched a criminal investigation into the CIA's destruction of videotapes depicting the harsh interrogation of terrorism suspects. "There is a basis for initiating a criminal investigation of this matter, and I have taken steps to...
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Move to Impeach Cheney Gains Support in Congress
SALEM, Ore. - A House Resolution to impeach U.S. Vice-President Dick Cheney, Dennis Kucinich's H.R. 799, is gathering more support. The national impeachment continues to grow and generate increasing interest since being referred to the House Judiciary Committee last month, a Kucinich spokesperson...
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Anti-War Protesters Arrested At Huckabee's Iowa Office
Des Moines, IA -- Police arrested three Iraq war protesters at the Iowa headquarters of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee on Monday after they camped inside and refused to leave until the Republican presidential candidate personally pledged to end the war if elected. Mona Shaw, 56, Kathy Kelly, 55...
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Presidential Candidates Diverge On US Joining War Crimes Court
The International Criminal Court isn't discussed much in the presidential campaign, but few issues are more revealing of a candidate's perspective on the United States' legal and political relations with the rest of the world. The court was established in 2002 to deal with cases of war crimes,...
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Last of Haditha Marines Avoids Murder Charges
The alleged leader of US troops who killed 24 unarmed Iraqi civilians in 2005 in Haditha will not face murder charges, a US Marines spokesman said. Sgt Frank Wuterich, 27, will stand trial for voluntary manslaughter, aggravated assault, dereliction of duty and other charges, officials said. The...
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Former "Dateline" Reporter Blasts NBC
NEW YORK - A former "Dateline NBC" correspondent claims that in the aftermath of September 11, the network diverted him from reporting on al Qaeda and instead wanted him to ride along with the country's "forgotten heroes," firefighters. John Hockenberry, who was laid off from "Dateline" in early...
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9/11 Commission Leaders Blast CIA on Interrogation Tapes
WASHINGTON - The leaders of a US commission that examined the September 11, 2001 terror attacks accused the CIA Wednesday of having obstructed their investigation by withholding information about videotaped interrogations of terror suspects. The goal of the blue ribbon 9/11 Commission, wrote...
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