Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

Corporate gatekeepers and big tech monopolists are making it more difficult than ever for independent media to survive. Please chip in today.

Bernie Sanders supporters prepare for a march at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia last year. Socialist groups are experiencing a surge in popularity, underscoring divisions within the Democratic Party. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Socialism on the Rise as Americans Seek Out Bold, Humane Alternatives to the Brutality of Trump and Capitalism

"Socialism is no longer a dirty word in the U.S."

Jake Johnson

The thousands of democratic socialists in the United States who have been organizing and fighting for justice in political obscurity for years likely never thought their ideas would be the subject of heated debates on prominent talk-shows like "The View" or feature pieces in such establishment mainstays as PBS and NPR.

"A political revolution is coming, and establishment politicians can get on board or be swept away."
—Tascha Van Auken, DSA

But—driven in large part by the persistent popularity of Bernie Sanders' brand of politics and the recent landslide victory of self-described democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in New York's congressional primary—the past several weeks have seen a torrent of news headlines, television segments, and hot takes on democratic socialism's rapid emergence into everyday political discourse, an indication that ideas previously defined as "fringe" by corporate media outlets, pundits, and politicians are quickly going mainstream.

"Democratic Socialism Surging in the Age of Trump," reads a representative headline from the Associated Press. "Is socialism having its moment in U.S. elections?" asked the title of a recent PBS "NewsHour" segment.

Even the New York Post, a right-wing tabloid, grudgingly admitted, "Like it or not, America is now seriously debating socialism."

Here are a few other headlines that have appeared in major publications over the past few weeks:


"Socialism is no longer a dirty word in the U.S," noted the Guardian's Arwa Mahdawi in a recent column highlighting the massive surge of interest in socialism over the past several months, which has translated into a record-breaking membership spike for the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA).

Previously hovering below ten thousand members, DSA's membership exploded past 20,000 in the months following Donald Trump's victory in the 2016 presidential elections. Now, just over a month after Ocasio-Cortez trounced corporate Democrat Rep. Joe Crowley, DSA boasts more than 47,000 dues-paying members.

"One month after voters in the South Bronx put 'democratic socialism' in the headlines, real America has registered its outrage at the Democrats' hard-left turn—by giving the party a larger lead in the generic congressional ballot."
—Eric Levitz, New York Magazine

It should perhaps come as no surprise that Americans—and millennials in particular—are seeking a bold and humane alternative to capitalism, a system that has produced staggering and ever-growing levels of inequality, rampant poverty, an existential environmental crisis, and, of course, soaring wealth for the few at the very top.

As New York City DSA member Neal Meyer explained in a recent piece for Jacobin, democratic socialists want to build an alternative future where—in contrast to the current economic landscape defined by financial insecurity for most—"everyone has a right to food, healthcare, a good home, an enriching education, and a union job that pays well."

"We want to guarantee all of this while stopping climate change and building an economy that's ecologically sustainable," Meyer added. "We want to build a world without war, where people in other countries are free from the fear of U.S. military intervention and economic exploitation. And we want to end mass incarceration and police brutality, gender violence, intolerance towards queer people, job and housing discrimination, deportations, and all other forms of oppression."

If the victory of Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Bernie Sanders' (I-Vt.) status as far-and-away the most popular politician in the U.S. are any evidence, such an ambitious vision has widespread appeal. As The Nation's John Nichols noted in a piece pointing to socialism's "winning streak," democratic socialists have also won primary victories in Pennsylvania and Philadelphia, providing further evidence that Americans aren't scared of the S-word.

"A political revolution is coming, and establishment politicians can get on board or be swept away," Tascha Van Auken, co-chair of DSA's national election committee, told Nichols.

The fact that so much of the American public finds the ideas pushed by democratic socialists like Sanders has sent the right's chief propaganda machine, Fox News, into "panic mode" as they struggle mightily to explain why free healthcare and education are actually bad.

Most often, the result has been free advertising for progressive policies:

Right-wing fury and fear-mongering seems to have done little to stem the rising socialist tide.

As New York Magazine's Eric Levitz noted over the weekend, "one month after voters in the South Bronx put 'democratic socialism' in the headlines, real America has registered its outrage at the Democrats' hard-left turn—by giving the party a larger lead in the generic congressional ballot."

From a column last week, The Ringer's Justin Charity adds that "socialists have proved more excited, coordinated, and immediately productive than any other Democratic coalition of the past decade."

"In the short term—which is to say, the midterms—the great excitement about left-wing politics will likely prove indispensable to the Democratic Party's efforts to recapture the House, if not also the Senate, and to mount a more resilient bulwark against Trumpism in Congress," Charity concludes. "In the long term, socialism may recalibrate the Democratic Party and the U.S. political equilibrium altogether. "


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

We've had enough. The 1% own and operate the corporate media. They are doing everything they can to defend the status quo, squash dissent and protect the wealthy and the powerful. The Common Dreams media model is different. We cover the news that matters to the 99%. Our mission? To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. Thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Can you chip in? We can't do it without you. Thank you.

Scientists to BlackRock Vice Chairman: New Fossil Fuel Development 'Incompatible' With 1.5°C

"The only responsible course of action is to do everything in our power to stop fossil fuel expansion and further emissions."

Jessica Corbett ·


Goldman Prize Awarded to Activists Who Showed Nature's 'Amazing Capability to Regenerate'

"While the many challenges before us can feel daunting, and at times make us lose faith, these seven leaders give us a reason for hope and remind us what can be accomplished in the face of adversity."

Julia Conley ·


Faith Leaders Call for Federal Election Monitors in Georgia to Protect Black Voters

"It is imperative that our election this November is monitored to preserve ballot integrity and ensure ballot security."

Brett Wilkins ·


'Inaction Is Bought': Here Are the Receipts on NRA's Purchase of GOP

"The issue is money in politics," said Nina Turner after the nation's latest mass killing of students and teachers. Right-wing lawmakers are "allowing children to die because of the gun lobby."

Kenny Stancil ·


'This Is on You!' Beto Interrupts Abbott Press Conference on Texas Massacre

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Beto O'Rourke accused Texas' GOP leaders of "doing nothing and offering us nothing" in the wake of the massacre at Robb Elementary School.

Jake Johnson ·

Common Dreams Logo