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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) speaks during a Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources hearing on Capitol Hill on January 27, 2021 in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images)

Taking Aim at 'Rigged' System, New Sanders Bills Would Reverse Trump's Corporate Tax Cut, End Offshoring

"At the end of the day, we need massive tax reform in this country, so that we end the tax loopholes and the giveaways to the wealthy and large corporations."

Jake Johnson

Aiming to reorient a tax system he describes as fundamentally "rigged," Sen. Bernie Sanders on Thursday unveiled a pair of bills that would restore the corporate tax rate to 35%, eliminate rules that allow U.S. companies to skirt their obligations by moving profits overseas, and impose new taxes on ultra-wealthy estates.

The legislation came just before Sanders (I-Vt.) presided over a Senate Budget Committee hearing on possible solutions to deep inequities in the U.S. tax code, which former President Donald Trump and the Republican Party made even more friendly to the rich and large corporations in 2017 by passing the deeply unpopular Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

"We need a tax system which demands the billionaire class pay its fair share of taxes and which reduces the obscene level of wealth inequality in America."
—Sen. Bernie Sanders

The first of Sanders' two bills would reverse a key element of the Trump-GOP tax law by raising the corporate rate from 21% to 35%, where it was prior to the 2017 cut. The legislation, titled the Corporate Tax Dodging Prevention Act (pdf), would also bar companies from shifting their profits offshore to avoid U.S. taxes.

The Vermont senator's second bill, the For the 99.5% Act (pdf), would take aim at the soaring wealth of the top 0.5% of U.S. households. The legislation, Sanders' office explained, "would impose a 45% tax rate on estates worth $3.5 million and a 65% tax rate on the value of an estate worth over $1 billion."

"Unbelievably, the United States today has more income and wealth inequality than almost any major country on Earth," Sanders said in a statement. "This inequality has only deepened with the economic crisis brought on by Covid and by a tax system that allows for billionaires to pay less in taxes than working people across the country."

"From a moral, economic, and political perspective, our nation will not thrive when so few have so much and so many have so little," the Vermont senator added. "We need a tax system which demands the billionaire class pay its fair share of taxes and which reduces the obscene level of wealth inequality in America."

Sanders' proposals come as President Joe Biden is reportedly considering tax hikes on the rich and corporations to help finance a forthcoming infrastructure plan. According to the Washington Post, White House officials have discussed raising the corporate tax rate to 28%—well short of Sanders' 35% proposal—and increasing the top marginal tax rate for individuals from 37% to 39.6%.

As chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, Sanders is well-positioned to exert significant influence over the infrastructure package, particularly if Democrats opt to push the legislation through the filibuster-proof budget reconciliation process—which seems likely, given GOP opposition.

"The second reconciliation bill will deal with long-term structural problems that we've had in this country long before the pandemic," Sanders told NPR. "We need to build millions of units of low-income and affordable housing. We must address the crisis of climate change and transform our energy system away from fossil fuel. And when we do those things, deal with infrastructure, deal with climate, we can in fact create many, many millions of good-paying jobs."


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Critics Warn Biden 'Summit for Democracy' Will Highlight Democrats' Failures at Home

"President Biden can't champion democracy across the globe without fulfilling his promise to protect our voting rights at home."

Jessica Corbett ·


'Like a Teenager Promising to Clean Their Room in 30 Years': Biden Net-Zero Climate Goal for 2050 Ridiculed

"2050 is an extremely weak goal for the federal government to free itself from climate-heating pollution. It ignores existing technology and adds decades to GSA's own commitment to 100% renewable energy by 2025."

Brett Wilkins ·


Biden Should Cancel Student Debt or Watch $85 Billion Evaporate From US Economy: Analysis

Far-reaching cancellation enacted by Biden could add more than $173 billion to the nation's GDP in 2022 alone.

Kenny Stancil ·


Given Cover by Red-Baiting GOP, Corporate Dems Rebuked for Tanking Biden Nominee for Top Bank Regulator

"If you think that Senate Democrats rose up to [Republicans'] shameful display of modern McCarthyism by rallying around President Biden's nominee or her ideas that banking should work for the middle class, then you don't know the soul of today's Democratic Party," wrote one columnist.

Julia Conley ·


'S.O.S.!': Groups in Red States Nationwide Plead With Democrats to Pass Voting Rights Bill

"We can tell you firsthand that our Republican senators have no interest in joining this effort."

Jake Johnson ·

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