Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

Corporate gatekeepers and big tech monopolists are making it more difficult than ever for independent media to survive. Please chip in today.

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) listen as Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) speaks during a news conference on Monday, December 14, 2020 in Washington, D.C.

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) listen as Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) speaks during a news conference on Monday, December 14, 2020 in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Al Drago for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

All 10 GOP Senators Behind Skimpy $600 Billion Covid Relief Offer Happily Voted for $740 Billion Military Budget

"Every single one of these Senate Republicans voted to give the Pentagon billions more than what they're willing to give to the American people."

Jake Johnson

Each of the 10 Republican senators who threw their support behind a widely criticized $600 billion coronavirus relief proposal on Sunday recently approved a whopping $740 billion military budget, a vote progressive lawmakers are highlighting as further evidence of the GOP's warped priorities amid a devastating pandemic and economic crisis.

"Every single one of these Senate Republicans voted to give the Pentagon billions more than what they're willing to give to the American people," Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.), chair emeritus of the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC), tweeted Sunday in response to the GOP's proposed "compromise" package.

"The QAnonGOP jammed through tax cuts and goodies for their corporate pals. Now, let's jam for the people. Reconciliation if they don't want to play ball."
—Rep. Rashida Tlaib

"$1.9 trillion is the floor—not the ceiling," Pocan added, referring to President Joe Biden's opening coronavirus relief offer.

While the details have not yet been fully hammered out, the GOP's watered-down relief proposal currently calls for reducing Biden's proposed direct payments from $1,400 to $1,000 per individual—and dramatically restricting eligibility for the checks—as well as scaling back the unemployment relief provisions outlined in the president's plan.

"The Biden plan would increase those benefits to $400 weekly and extend them through September," the Washington Post explained. "The GOP plan would keep the payments at $300 per week and extend them through June."

The Republican proposal, as it stands, was summarized in a letter sent to Biden Sunday by Sens. Susan Collins (Maine), Mitt Romney (Utah), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), Bill Cassidy (La.), Rob Portman (Ohio), Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.), Todd Young (Ind.), Jerry Moran (Kan.), Mike Rounds (S.D.), and Thom Tillis (N.C.).

All ten Republicans voted in July to approve the Senate's version of the $740 billion National Defense Authorization Act, and then voted last month to override former President Donald Trump's veto of the measure.

With Biden expected to meet with the group of Republicans at the White House on Monday, progressives reiterated their position that anything less than the president's opening offer would be unacceptable and argued Democrats should use their unified control of the federal government to pass a robust aid package without GOP input.

"Covid relief can't wait any longer," said Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), chair of the CPC. "If the Republican Party doesn't feel the urgency of Americans who are struggling to keep food on the table, then it's time for us to act without them."

CPC vice chair Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) echoed that massage late Sunday, declaring that "during a global health crisis and a historic economic hardship, this is not the time to 'compromise' our residents."

"The QAnonGOP jammed through tax cuts and goodies for their corporate pals," Tlaib tweeted, referring to Republicans' use of the budget reconciliation process in 2017 to pass their $1.5 trillion tax bill with a simple-majority vote.

"Now, let's jam for the people," said Tlaib. "Reconciliation if they don't want to play ball."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

We've had enough. The 1% own and operate the corporate media. They are doing everything they can to defend the status quo, squash dissent and protect the wealthy and the powerful. The Common Dreams media model is different. We cover the news that matters to the 99%. Our mission? To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. Thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Can you chip in? We can't do it without you. Thank you.

Scientists to BlackRock Vice Chairman: New Fossil Fuel Development 'Incompatible' With 1.5°C

"The only responsible course of action is to do everything in our power to stop fossil fuel expansion and further emissions."

Jessica Corbett ·


Goldman Prize Awarded to Activists Who Showed Nature's 'Amazing Capability to Regenerate'

"While the many challenges before us can feel daunting, and at times make us lose faith, these seven leaders give us a reason for hope and remind us what can be accomplished in the face of adversity."

Julia Conley ·


Faith Leaders Call for Federal Election Monitors in Georgia to Protect Black Voters

"It is imperative that our election this November is monitored to preserve ballot integrity and ensure ballot security."

Brett Wilkins ·


'Inaction Is Bought': Here Are the Receipts on NRA's Purchase of GOP

"The issue is money in politics," said Nina Turner after the nation's latest mass killing of students and teachers. Right-wing lawmakers are "allowing children to die because of the gun lobby."

Kenny Stancil ·


'This Is on You!' Beto Interrupts Abbott Press Conference on Texas Massacre

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Beto O'Rourke accused Texas' GOP leaders of "doing nothing and offering us nothing" in the wake of the massacre at Robb Elementary School.

Jake Johnson ·

Common Dreams Logo