Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

"There's a reason for Facebook's failure that even industry pundits might understand," explains Karr. "Facebook has long been aware that its ad-driven business model was amplifying hateful and divisive posts over users' friendlier fare. But it chose to bury an internal report warning against the use of its engagement algorithms in this way." (Image: Stop Hate for Profit)

"There's a reason for Facebook's failure that even industry pundits might understand," explains Karr. "Facebook has long been aware that its ad-driven business model was amplifying hateful and divisive posts over users' friendlier fare. But it chose to bury an internal report warning against the use of its engagement algorithms in this way." (Image: Stop Hate for Profit)

#StopHateforProfit: What Pundits Get Wrong About the Facebook Ad Boycott

To stop profiting from hate—and align the company more closely with its mission—Facebook would have to rewire the technology that drives its multi-billion-dollar advertising enterprise.

Tim Karr

“Yes, but …”

That’s the opening refrain of many media pundits when asked to comment on the phenomenal success of the #StopHateForProfit boycott, which now counts more than 750 companies pausing their Facebook advertising in July to protest the spread of racism on the platform.

"Business as usual isn’t good enough."

Yes, but the monthly advertising budget of these companies is only a sliver of the ad revenues Facebook takes in each year.

Yes, but Facebook’s stock price, which dropped some eight percent at the outset of the campaign, will rebound soon.

Yes, but this is only a temporary public-relations stunt; these companies will return to advertising on Facebook as usual.

Yes, but.

There’s something missing from these fresh takes: For the past two weeks, the #StopHateForProfit boycott has been shifting the ground under Facebook’s feet in ways that bean counters in the commenting class can’t seem to tabulate.

Culture shift

This shift isn’t about revenues, or profits or market valuations. It’s broad and deep, and already taking root in Silicon Valley, where popular social-media sites including Reddit, Twitch and YouTube recently deplatformed dangerous, racist content that had found a home on their services.

Even Facebook blinked, announcing last Friday a handful of policy changes designed to curtail the spread of hateful activities so, in Zuckerberg's words, “people can hold us accountable for progress.”

Despite the gesture, Zuckerberg thinks Facebook can wait out this boycott without making more meaningful concessions or taking seriously the very real complaints that racial-justice advocates are leveling against the company.

Zuckerberg admitted as much during a company town hall last Friday, where he told employees that he won’t change policies “because of a threat to a small percent of our revenue,” The Information reports.

"Zuckerberg thinks Facebook can wait out this boycott without making more meaningful concessions or taking seriously the very real complaints that racial-justice advocates are leveling against the company."

Yes, but … the real shift is happening outside Facebook headquarters, where it’s spread beyond Zuckerberg’s control. It’s a change to ideas about hate speech and disinformation that Facebook will have to reckon with soon if it hopes to remain culturally relevant.

“We’ve long had this debate on Reddit and internally, weighing the trade-offs between speech and safety,” Reddit CEO Steve Huffman told the New York Times. “There’s certain speech—for example, harassment and hate—that prevents other people from speaking. And if we have individuals and communities on Reddit that are preventing other people from using Reddit the way we intend, then that means they’re working directly against our mission.”

Practicing what they preach

Reddit’s mission—“to bring community and belonging to everybody in the world”—is not unlike Facebook’s: “to give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together." 

The only difference is that Reddit now seems dedicated to practicing what it preaches. And that includes evicting those who have weaponized its platform to harass, humiliate, silence and even incite violence against people who are less privileged.

External pressures have brought Reddit and other social media companies to accept a greater degree of responsibility toward their communities. In 2020, we’ve witnessed “a perfect storm of factors” driving these changes, writes Siva Vaidhyanathan. These include a popular backlash against COVID-19 disinformation on these networks, calls from supporters of the Movement for Black Lives to do a better job addressing bigotry, and disgust with a president who uses his social-media platform to egg on white supremacists and divide people.

The #StopHateForProfit campaign was the tipping point.

For years, social media platforms have talked a good game about their responsibility to build more open, equitable and democratic communities online. It’s only in the past weeks that public pressure joined forces with advertisers to compel the industry to start owning up to its pledges.

The largest and most powerful social media company, Facebook has been reluctant to move with the times.

A study by the global nonprofit Avaaz found dozens of Facebook groups and pages with content explicitly calling for a race war in the United States. Many of these pages were created after Facebook claimed to have changed its policies to prevent the spread of such content.

Pressure from the outside in

There’s a reason for Facebook’s failure that even industry pundits might understand.

"The largest and most powerful social media company, Facebook has been reluctant to move with the times."

Facebook has long been aware that its ad-driven business model was amplifying hateful and divisive posts over users’ friendlier fare. But it chose to bury an internal report warning against the use of its engagement algorithms in this way.

To stop profiting from hate—and align the company more closely with its mission—Facebook would have to rewire the technology that drives its multi-billion-dollar advertising enterprise.

The pressure to make that happen—and for Facebook to meet the many other demands put forth by the #StopHateForProfit campaign—has to come from the outside in.

Advertisers need to work with advocates to extend and expand the advertising boycott until Facebook changes its hate-powered business model. People need to pressure lawmakers to demand transparency and accountability from Facebook executives. We all need to support employees within Facebook, who are urging their bosses to do better.

Business as usual isn’t good enough. American culture has shifted. Facebook must change, too.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.
Tim Karr

Tim Karr

Tim Carr is the Campaign Director for Free Press and SavetheInternet.com. Karr oversees campaigns on public broadcasting and noncommercial media, fake news and propaganda, journalism in crisis, and the future of the Internet. Before joining Free Press, Tim served as executive director of MediaChannel.org and vice president of Globalvision New Media and the Globalvision News Network.

 

We've had enough. The 1% own and operate the corporate media. They are doing everything they can to defend the status quo, squash dissent and protect the wealthy and the powerful. The Common Dreams media model is different. We cover the news that matters to the 99%. Our mission? To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. Thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Can you chip in? We can't do it without you. Thank you.

Top 10 US Billionaires Got $1 Billion Richer Every Day of Pandemic

"Each made about the same in a single minute as the average American household earns in an entire year. This can't continue," said Americans for Tax Fairness.

Jake Johnson ·


14-Year-Old Indigenous Land Defender Killed in Colombia

"We condemn the killing of Breiner David Cucuñame!" says Fridays for Future MAPA. "We join the calls for justice and stand in solidarity with the environmental defenders in Colombia and across the world!"

Jessica Corbett ·


Lyft Donates $14 Million to Keep Massachusetts Drivers Down

The largest one-time political donation in state history goes to a coalition fighting to stop ride-hailing and delivery companies from having to classify their drivers as employees.

Brett Wilkins ·


Catching Up With Progressives, Biden to Provide N95s Nationwide

Sen. Bernie Sanders, who introduced the Masks for All Act in July 2020, called the move "a good first step."

Julia Conley ·


Bank Blocks Donations Supporting Cuban Effort to Vaccinate World

"A European bank, established in the Netherlands, has decided to put the interests of the U.S. government above the lives of millions of people."

Kenny Stancil ·

Support our work.

We are independent, non-profit, advertising-free and 100% reader supported.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values.
Direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to our Newsletter.


Common Dreams, Inc. Founded 1997. Registered 501(c3) Non-Profit | Privacy Policy
Common Dreams Logo