Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

There are only a few days left in our critical Mid-Year Campaign and we truly might not make it without your help.
Please join us. If you rely on independent media, support Common Dreams today. This is crunch time. We need you now.

Join the small group of generous readers who donate, keeping Common Dreams free for millions of people each year. Without your help, we won’t survive.

It holds that Obama promised “Hope and Change” but instead delivered boilerplate centrism that produced a disillusioned working-class, paving the way for a right-wing populist resurgence. (Photo: Kent Kanouse/flickr/cc)

It holds that Obama promised "Hope and Change" but instead delivered boilerplate centrism that produced a disillusioned working-class, paving the way for a right-wing populist resurgence. (Photo: Kent Kanouse/flickr/cc)

Obama Is Wrong to Push Democratic Party Centrism

Obama’s recent comments highlight an important division in the Democratic Party, one that’s prompted the recent emergence of two new candidates: Deval Patrick, the former governor of Massachusetts and personal friend of Obama, and Michael Bloomberg.

Leland Nally

 by The Progressive

Former President Barack Obama recently offered some pointed criticism of the Democratic party’s “activist wing,” cautioning candidates to not move too far left and to remain “rooted in reality.”

“The average American doesn’t think we have to completely tear down the system and remake it,” Obama told an audience in Washington, D.C. “This is still a country that is less revolutionary than it is interested in improvement.”

This is an odd take from a candidate who famously ran (and won!) on making major change, but it mirrors the feelings of establishment Democrats who remain uneasy of popular candidates including Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and progressive policies like Medicare for All.

Yet Obama’s comments highlight an important division in the Democratic Party, one that’s  prompted the recent emergence of two new candidates: Deval Patrick, the former governor of Massachusetts and personal friend of Obama, and Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City.

Patrick says he entered the race over fears of a floundering Joe Biden, and Bloomberg was apparently prompted to run by his personal anxiety over the possible nomination of Sanders or Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

As much as the donor class is concerned with preserving old systems, voters are mainly funneling their energy towards building new ones.

These tensions come down to two competing theories of the Obama presidency. The first holds that Obama pushed the country too far left, causing a political backlash against a progressive administration that was out of touch with the American people. This is a favorite of the donor class and Democratic establishment, which urge a more moderate approach to win back Obama-Trump voters.

The other theory is almost exactly opposite. It holds that Obama promised “Hope and Change” but instead delivered boilerplate centrism that produced a disillusioned working-class, paving the way for a right-wing populist resurgence. Proponents believe the fabled Obama coalition is still out there, waiting to be ignited by a genuine leftwing platform, as shown by the enthusiasm for Sanders and Warren — candidates who have called for “political revolution” and “big, structural change,” respectively.

Obama’s call for incrementalism shows he clearly believes the former. I think the evidence proves him wrong.

The fact is, Trump’s voters did not crave centrism and moderation when they elected him in 2016. Trump, like Obama before him, was the candidate of big-time change. If anyone wanted to tear down “the system,” it was the 2016 Trump voter.

When asked whether Obama was right in saying that “the average American doesn’t think we have to completely tear down the system,” Sanders replied, “Well, it depends on what you mean by tear down the system.” He went on to note that his political agenda, including raising the minimum wage to a living wage, and guaranteeing health care coverage for all, is “supported by the vast majority of working people.”

Which system is Obama worried about “tearing down,” exactly? Of the progressive policies on the docket this primary, the only systems I see endangered are insurance companies, corporate profiteers, flagrant threats to a livable planet, and whatever hellish system is the one that puts kids in cages on the U.S.-Mexico border.

As much as the donor class is concerned with preserving old systems, voters are mainly funneling their energy towards building new ones. In the case of health care, America doesn’t really have a “system” so much as a marketplace that sells health care services. Medicare for All is about finally building a system that works for everybody.

The Democratic establishment fails to properly recognize where the momentum lies, and Obama’s calls for incrementalism only stand to embolden the status quo and needlessly stifle the most energized portion of his own party.


© 2021 The Progressive
Leland Nally

Leland Nally

Leland Nally is a writer and filmmaker living in Koreatown, Los Angeles.

Just a few days left in our crucial Mid-Year Campaign and we might not make it without your help.
Who funds our independent journalism? Readers like you who believe in our mission: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. No corporate advertisers. No billionaire founder. Our non-partisan, nonprofit media model has only one source of revenue: The people who read and value this work and our mission. That's it.
And the model is simple: If everyone just gives whatever amount they can afford and think is reasonable—$3, $9, $29, or more—we can continue. If not enough do, we go dark.

All the small gifts add up to something otherwise impossible. Please join us today. Donate to Common Dreams. This is crunch time. We need you now.

Jan. 6 Panel Subpoenas Trump White House Counsel Pat Cipollone

Noting his refusal to cooperate beyond an informal April interview, the committee's chair said that "we are left with no choice."

Jessica Corbett ·


Sanders Pushes Back Against AIPAC Super PAC With Endorsements of Tlaib and Levin

"Once again, these extremists are pouring millions of dollars into a congressional race to try to ensure the Democratic Party advances the agenda of powerful corporations and the billionaire class."

Brett Wilkins ·


Missouri Hospital System Resumes Providing Plan B After 'Shameful' Ban

The health network had stopped offering emergency contraception over fears of violating the state's abortion law—a "dangerous" move that critics warned could become a national trend.

Jessica Corbett ·


'An Act of Conquest': Native Americans Condemn SCOTUS Tribal Sovereignty Ruling

"Every few paragraphs of the majority opinion has another line that dismissively and casually cuts apart tribal independence that Native ancestors gave their lives for," observed one Indigenous law professor.

Brett Wilkins ·


'Lunacy': Democrats Risk Running Out of Time to Confirm Federal Judges

"Democrats aren't filling open seats right now in federal district courts because, for unfathomable reasons, they are letting red state senators block nominees," said one critic.

Julia Conley ·

Common Dreams Logo