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President Donald Trump addresses the nation from the Oval Office about the widening coronavirus crisis on March 11, 2020 in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images)

Insurance Industry Corrects Trump: Actually, We're Only Waiving Copays for Coronavirus Testing, Not Treatment

"Heaven forbid they miss a chance to bankrupt sick people."

Jake Johnson

In a prime-time televised address so filled with blatant errors that fact-checkers and the White House struggled to keep up and correct the record, President Donald Trump Wednesday night claimed that major U.S. insurance companies "have agreed to waive all copayments for coronavirus treatments" as the disease rapidly spreads across the nation.

A spokesperson for America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), a major insurance industry lobbying group, was quick to clarify that, actually, companies are only waiving copays for "testing." For those who test positive for COVID-19, any treatment will still come at a (potentially massive) cost.

"Insurance companies exist to make a profit. They do not exist to provide you with healthcare. Profiting off a pandemic is beyond immoral."
—Kim Nelson

"For testing. Not for treatment," the AHIP spokesperson told Politico healthcare reporter Sarah Owermohle after Trump delivered his prepared remarks, which included a muddled declaration of a temporary travel ban from much of Europe, sparking widespread confusion and sending markets into an even deeper tailspin.

A White House official also stepped in to correct Trump's claim that insurance companies agreed to waive copays for coronavirus treatment after meeting with the president at the White House on Tuesday.

The anonymous official told CNN's Jim Acosta that Trump, who read his remarks off a teleprompter, meant to say that insurance companies "have agreed to waive all copays on coronavirus testing."

"Heaven forbid they miss a chance to bankrupt sick people," tweeted Lori Kearns, legislative director for Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), the most prominent champion of a policy that would entirely eliminate insurance copays, premiums, and deductibles.

The coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. has thrown into sharp relief the systemic flaws at the heart of America's profit-driven healthcare system, which has left around 30 million people entirely without insurance and tens of millions more with inadequate coverage. As Common Dreams reported, some have been hit thousands of dollars in surprise medical bills after seeking coronavirus testing.

"The national healthcare system is of course the most important tool for any country trying to fight off an epidemic—all citizens need to be able to get tested, receive treatment, or be quarantined if necessary," wrote The Week's Ryan Cooper in a column last week. "If and when a vaccine is developed, the system needs to distribute it to everyone as fast as possible. That means handing it out for free in locations across the country, and perhaps making it mandatory if uptake is insufficient."

"The American healthcare system fails at every one of these tasks," Cooper added.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), a supporter of Medicare for All, suggested in a tweet Wednesday night that—among other measures—the U.S. government should extend Medicare or Medicaid coverage to everyone in the U.S. amid the coronavirus outbreak, which has hit at least 34 states and killed more than 30 people.


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'Infuriating': Biden Rebuked for Continued Opposition to Supreme Court Expansion

"What does Biden 'agree' with doing?" Mehdi Hasan asked. "What does the leader of this country want to do to stop the increasingly fascistic assault on our democratic institutions and basic rights?"

Kenny Stancil ·


'We Need Action': Biden, Democrats Urged to Protect Abortion Access in Post-Roe US

"The Supreme Court doesn't get the final say on abortion," Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith wrote in a new op-ed.

Kenny Stancil ·


Motorist 'Tried to Murder' Abortion Rights Advocates at Iowa Protest, Witnesses Say

Although one witness said the driver went "out of his way" to hit pro-choice protestors in the street, Cedar Rapids police declined to make an arrest.

Kenny Stancil ·


'A Hate Crime': Oslo Pride Parade Canceled After Deadly Shooting at Gay Bar

A 42-year-old gunman has been charged with terrorism following what Norway's prime minister called a "terrible and deeply shocking attack on innocent people."

Kenny Stancil ·


'We WILL Fight Back': Outrage, Resolve as Protests Erupt Against SCOTUS Abortion Ruling

Demonstrators took to the streets Friday to defiantly denounce the Supreme Court's right-wing supermajority after it rescinded a constitutional right for the first time in U.S. history.

Brett Wilkins ·

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