Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

The fires engulfing the Amazon rain forest are a sign that the Earth is approaching an environmental and ecological "tipping point" that all of humanity must work together to avoid, the U.N.'s top biodiversity expert said Friday. (Photo: ©Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace)

Tipping Point: UN Biodiversity Chief Warns Burning of Amazon Could Lead to 'Cascading Collapse of Natural Systems'

"If we don't work together, we are going to die together."

Julia Conley

Unless world governments, consumers, and businesses all work together to address the root causes of the current burning of the Amazon rain forest, the Arctic, and forests in the Congo and Angola, the planet will continue careening toward a point of no return, the U.N.'s top biodiversity expert said Friday.  

Cristiana Paşca Palmer, executive secretary of the U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity, called the fires that have torn through more than 1,300 square miles of the Amazon this year "extraordinarily concerning."

"But it is not just the Amazon," she told The Guardian. "We're also concerned with what's happening in other forests and ecosystems, and with the broader and rapid degradation of nature."

"We need to address the root causes. Even if the amount involved in extinguishing fires in rainforests was a billion or 500 million dollars, we won't see an improvement unless more profound structural changes are taking place. We need a transformation in the way we consume and produce."
—Cristiana Paşca Palmer, U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity
The Amazon fires themselves are a sign, Paşca Palmer said, that "we are moving towards the tipping points that scientists talk about that could produce cascading collapses of natural systems."

Green groups have largely blamed Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro for the fires, pointing to his encouragement of what one indigenous leader called "predatory behavior" of loggers, ranchers, and miners who want to clear forests for their industrial use.

World governments and philanthropists have offered tens of millions of dollars to help save the rain forest, often called the "lungs of the Earth" because of the amount of oxygen its trees produce, but Paşca Palmer emphasized that a paradigm shift is needed in how the world approaches biodiversity and ecosystems.

"We need to address the root causes," Paşca Palmer said. "Even if the amount involved in extinguishing fires in rainforests was a billion or 500 million dollars, we won't see an improvement unless more profound structural changes are taking place. We need a transformation in the way we consume and produce."

Helping to protect the world's pollinators by ending the use of harmful pesticides, cutting fossil fuel emissions to net zero by 2030 to avoid a catastrophic warming of the planet by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and ending habitat destruction through deforestation and other human activities, are all necessary to maintain the Earth's biodiversity, the U.N. panel led by Paşca Palmer says.  

Paşca Palmer pointed to robust biodiversity programs in Costa Rica and Colombia as models for the rest of the world when they meet for an upcoming biodiversity summit in Kunming, China next year.

Costa Rica's government has offered payments to landowners for preserving forests and planting trees, while Colombia has nearly doubled its federally protected lands in recent years.  

"I hope this will have a snowball effect," said Paşca Palmer. "It's a growing movement. I feel that now the heads of state are embracing this, we have a good signal."

On social media, Extinction Rebellion Ireland expressed support for Paşca Palmer's message, writing, "If we don't work together, we are going to die together."

Climate campaigner Tony Juniper called the U.N. official's comments "a timely reminder that nature underpins the human world."

"It is vital to embed ecological recovery at the heart of our economic system," wrote Juniper, "a reality that must be reflected in actual policy and spending decisions."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

... We've had enough. The 1% own and operate the corporate media. They are doing everything they can to defend the status quo, squash dissent and protect the wealthy and the powerful. The Common Dreams media model is different. We cover the news that matters to the 99%. Our mission? To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. Thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Can you chip in? We can't do it without you. Thank you.

'Like a Teenager Promising to Clean Their Room in 30 Years': Biden Net-Zero Climate Goal for 2050 Ridiculed

"2050 is an extremely weak goal for the federal government to free itself from climate-heating pollution. It ignores existing technology and adds decades to GSA's own commitment to 100% renewable energy by 2025."

Brett Wilkins ·


Biden Should Cancel Student Debt or Watch $85 Billion Evaporate From US Economy: Analysis

Far-reaching cancellation enacted by Biden could add more than $173 billion to the nation's GDP in 2022 alone.

Kenny Stancil ·


Given Cover by Red-Baiting GOP, Corporate Dems Rebuked for Tanking Biden Nominee for Top Bank Regulator

"If you think that Senate Democrats rose up to [Republicans'] shameful display of modern McCarthyism by rallying around President Biden's nominee or her ideas that banking should work for the middle class, then you don't know the soul of today's Democratic Party," wrote one columnist.

Julia Conley ·


'S.O.S.!': Groups in Red States Nationwide Plead With Democrats to Pass Voting Rights Bill

"We can tell you firsthand that our Republican senators have no interest in joining this effort."

Jake Johnson ·


Revealed: US Public Pension Funds Are 'Quiet Culprits of Climate Chaos'

One activist called divestment "an ethical responsibility" given that "maintaining the status quo of fossil fuel energy production and investments will unquestionably lead to a self-created catastrophe."

Jessica Corbett ·

Support our work.

We are independent, non-profit, advertising-free and 100% reader supported.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values.
Direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to our Newsletter.


Common Dreams, Inc. Founded 1997. Registered 501(c3) Non-Profit | Privacy Policy
Common Dreams Logo