Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

Dear Common Dreams Readers:
Corporations and billionaires have their own media. Shouldn't we? When you “follow the money” that funds our independent journalism, it all leads back to this: people like you. Our supporters are what allows us to produce journalism in the public interest that is beholden only to people, our planet, and the common good. Please support our Mid-Year Campaign so that we always have a newsroom for the people that is funded by the people. Thank you for your support. --Jon Queally, managing editor

Join the small group of generous readers who donate, keeping Common Dreams free for millions of people each year. Without your help, we won’t survive.

Recent polling by the Kaiser Family Foundation has shown that a majority of Americans support a Medicare for All healthcare program. (Photo: Molly Adams/Flickr/cc)

In Clear Sign of Progress for Medicare for All Advocates, Insurance and Pharma Giants Build Wall to Defeat Single-Payer

"Whether they like it or not, we will succeed in guaranteeing healthcare for all because this is an idea whose time has come."

Julia Conley

Just as many Democratic lawmakers have signed on in the past year as co-sponsors of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) Medicare for All bill, healthcare corporations are banding together to fight the swelling wave of support for a single-payer healthcare system.

Health insurance and drug companies have formed a coalition aimed at "building on the strength of employer-provided health coverage," according to the groups—a transparent attempt to defeat the momentum building among Medicare for All advocates, using attack ads and research biased against a single-payer system.

The coalition, called the Partnership for America's Health Care Future and including the industry groups America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the American Medical Association, and the Federation of American Hospitals, is being taken not as a significant threat to Sanders' plan and a similar proposal in the House, but as evidence that the country is closer than ever to implementing single-payer healthcare.

Industry giants' apparent anxiety over the end of for-profit health insurance is "clear evidence that we are making progress," Adam Gaffney of Physicians for a National Health Program told The Hill.

Sanders himself told the outlet that it did not surprise him "that the insurance companies and drug companies will spend an enormous sum of money in lobbying, campaign contributions, and television ads to defeat Medicare for all, but they are on the wrong side of history."

Public support for Medicare for All has been rapidly rising since Congress passed the Affordable Care Act in 2010. This past March, polling by the Kaiser Family Foundation showed that 59 percent of Americans support a national health plan paid for by the government. Less than a year earlier, in June 2017, the same poll found that just 53 percent had been in favor of Medicare for All.

Despite mounting evidence to contrary, the Partnership for America's Health Care Future will be devoted to convincing the public that, as a spokesperson told The Hill, "Most Americans support commonsense, pragmatic solutions that don't interrupt the coverage they rely upon for themselves and their families."

The "pragmatic solutions" that families allegedly want to continue relying on will reportedly involve premiums that are expected to go up as much as 91 percent in some parts of the country this fall. Sanders has maintained that his Medicare for All proposal would save the average American household at least $3,800 per year. 

Nearly two-thirds of House Democrats have also signed on as co-sponsors of a single-payer healthcare bill—a number that could go up if the party regains a House majority by flipping 23 seats in November.

"Whether they like it or not," Sanders said of health insurance and pharmaceutical giants, "we will succeed in guaranteeing healthcare for all because this is an idea whose time has come."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

"I'm sure this will be all over the corporate media, right?"
That’s what one longtime Common Dreams reader said yesterday after the newsroom reported on new research showing how corporate price gouging surged to a nearly 70-year high in 2021. While major broadcasters, newspapers, and other outlets continue to carry water for their corporate advertisers when they report on issues like inflation, economic inequality, and the climate emergency, our independence empowers us to provide you stories and perspectives that powerful interests don’t want you to have. But this independence is only possible because of support from readers like you. You make the difference. If our support dries up, so will we. Our crucial Mid-Year Campaign is now underway and we are in emergency mode to make sure we raise the necessary funds so that every day we can bring you the stories that corporate, for-profit outlets ignore and neglect. Please, if you can, support Common Dreams today.

 

Abortion Rights Defenders Applaud Judge's Block on Utah 'Trigger Ban'

"Today is a win, but it is only the first step in what will undoubtedly be a long and difficult fight," said one pro-choice advocate.

Brett Wilkins ·


Scores Feared Dead and Wounded as Russian Missiles Hit Ukraine Shopping Center

"People just burned alive," said Ukraine's interior minister, while the head of the Poltava region stated that "it is too early to talk about the final number of the killed."

Brett Wilkins ·


Biodiversity Risks Could Persist for Decades After Global Temperature Peak

One study co-author said the findings "should act as a wake-up call that delaying emissions cuts will mean a temperature overshoot that comes at an astronomical cost to nature and humans that unproven negative emission technologies cannot simply reverse."

Jessica Corbett ·


Amnesty Report Demands Biden Take Action to End Death Penalty

"The world is waiting for the USA to do what almost 100 countries have achieved during this past half-century—total abolition of the death penalty," said the group.

Julia Conley ·


Pointing to 'Recently Obtained Evidence,' Jan. 6 Panel Calls Surprise Tuesday Hearing

The announcement came less than a week after the House panel delayed new hearings until next month, citing a "deluge" of fresh evidence.

Common Dreams staff ·

Common Dreams Logo