Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

In 2007, Kay Hiramine, pictured here with President George W. Bush, was awarded the president's Volunteer Service Award—despite serving as a paid operative of the U.S. Department of Defense. (Photo: White House archives)

In 2007, Kay Hiramine, pictured here with President George W. Bush, was awarded the president's Volunteer Service Award—despite serving as a paid operative of the U.S. Department of Defense. (Photo: White House archives)

Top-Secret Pentagon Program Exploited Aid Workers as Covert Spies

Experts warn that Department of Defense espionage program places international NGOs at great risk

Lauren McCauley

It is the stuff of spy novels, but a new investigation published Monday reveals that the U.S. Pentagon for years funneled millions to a charity organization employing it to serve as the front group for global espionage—very real revelations that experts warn could have dangerous implications for aid workers worldwide.

After a months-long investigation, The Intercept's Matthew Cole, with help from Margot Williams and Lee Fang, exposes the reach of a highly-classified Department of Defense program, which ran from December 2004 to 2013.

The program was reportedly the "brainchild" of Lt. Gen. William "Jerry" Boykin, an evangelical Christian who served under President George W. Bush. After the 9/11 attacks, Boykin was charged with expanding the intelligence gathering arm of the DoD and, "taking a page from the CIA's playbook," began tapping NGOs to use as a cover for Pentagon espionage operations.

The exposé highlights one group, the Colorado Springs-based Christian organization Humanitarian International Services Group, or HISG, whose founder, Kay Hiramine, had for years been on the Pentagon payroll and whose organization reportedly had millions funneled to it via a "complex web" of private trusts and nonprofits.

The Pentagon reportedly employed HISG, which provided disaster relief and supplies to poor and war-torn countries, to infiltrate North Korea to gain access and information regarding its nuclear program—relying on the organization's "unwitting" employees, volunteers, and contacts to do so.

The Intercept reports:

The Pentagon tasked Hiramine with gathering the intelligence it needed inside North Korea, and Hiramine would in turn utilize HISG’s access to the country to complete the assignments, according to two former military officials with knowledge of the effort. Hiramine, in his role as CEO of HISG, tapped Christian missionaries, aid workers, and Chinese smugglers to move equipment into and around North Korea — none of whom had any idea that they were part of a secret Pentagon operation. 

...

Because American intelligence has so few assets inside North Korea, much of Hiramine’s task was to find transportation routes to move military equipment — and potentially clandestine operatives — in and around the country. The Pentagon would eventually move sensors and small radio beacons through Hiramine’s transportation network, according to another former military official. Much of what Hiramine was doing was what the military refers to as “operational preparation of the environment,” or OPE, a category that encompasses clandestine intelligence gathering and prepositioning equipment inside a country for future conflicts.

In one early "test run," an HISG shipment of charity clothing included a secret cache of Bibles in order to see if supplies could get into the country without being discovered.

As Cole notes, HISG "was one of several NGOs used by the Pentagon in this way. Some, like HISG, already existed as fledgling organizations, while others were created from scratch by the Pentagon."

The investigation's findings, "that the Pentagon used an NGO and unwitting humanitarian volunteers for intelligence gathering," constitutes a major transgression and threatens the safety and work of aid organizations worldwide. 

Sam Worthington, president of InterAction, an association of nearly 200 American NGOs, told the reporters that such activity "violates international principles" and places legitimate aid and development workers at great risk. 

"It is unacceptable that the Pentagon or any other U.S. agency use nonprofits for intelligence gathering," Worthington said. "It is a violation of the basic trust between the U.S. government and its civic sector."

Indeed, a CIA-directed mission in 2011 which employed a Pakistani doctor to gather DNA samples of Osama bin Laden's presumed family members, under the guise of a hepatitis vaccination program, has resulted in numerous attacks on "legitimate" medical groups.

Further, as noted by Sarah Knuckey, Columbia Law professor and director of the school's Human Rights Clinic, these findings also give "rhetorical ammo" to repressive governments seeking to restrict NGO activities within their borders.

HISG was reportedly shuttered in 2013 after Adm. William McRaven shut down the North Korean spying operation the year before. It's "unclear" if President Obama was ever briefed on the program, The Intercept notes, and the White House declined to comment.

The Intercept investigation relied on interviews with more than a dozen current and former military and intelligence officials, humanitarian aid workers, missionaries, U.S. officials, as well as former HISG staffers. The Pentagon provided no comment on HISG or the espionage operations in North Korea.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

This is the world we live in. This is the world we cover.

Because of people like you, another world is possible. There are many battles to be won, but we will battle them together—all of us. Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We don't survive on clicks. We don't want advertising dollars. We want the world to be a better place. But we can't do it alone. It doesn't work that way. We need you. If you can help today—because every gift of every size matters—please do. Without Your Support We Simply Don't Exist.

Please select a donation method:

Bush, Pressley, and Omar Sleep Outside Capitol to Demand Extension of Eviction Moratorium

Rep. Cori Bush, who was formerly unhoused, slammed her Democratic colleagues who "chose to go on vacation early today rather than staying to vote to keep people in their homes."

Jake Johnson ·


As Progressives Call for End to Blockade, Biden Announces More Sanctions Against Cuba

The move comes after Democratic leadership in the House blocked an amendment to roll back limits on how much money people in the United States can send to family on the island nation.

Jessica Corbett ·


Progressives Issue Dire Warning as House Bill to Extend Eviction Moratorium Dies

"If Congress does not act now, the fallout of the eviction crisis will undoubtedly set us backwards as the Covid-19 pandemic continues to ravish our communities, needlessly contributing to more death and destruction."

Brett Wilkins ·


Citing Donziger Case, Dems Raise Alarm About Use of Private Prosecutors in Federal Court

Private prosecutions of criminal contempt charges, said a pair of senators, "are highly unusual and can raise concerning questions of fundamental fairness in our criminal justice system."

Jessica Corbett ·


'About Damn Time': DOJ Says Treasury Department Must Give Trump's Tax Returns to Congress

"This case is now bigger even than Donald Trump's crimes. Neither the courts, nor the machinery of our government, exist to bodyguard a corrupt private citizen from transparency."

Jake Johnson ·