Joseph Torres

Joseph Torres, wrote this article for 9 Strategies to End Corporate Rule, the Spring 2012 issue of YES! Magazine. Joseph is senior external affairs director at Free Press, and co-author, with Juan Gonzalez, of News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media.

Articles by this author

Views
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Killing Net Neutrality Is a Critical Goal in Trump's Campaign Against Free Speech
The president’s appointed chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, unveiled his plan to kill Net Neutrality at a closed-door FreedomWorks-sponsored event on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. It’s appropriate that Pai made this announcement at a gathering sponsored by a telecom-...
Read more
Views
Saturday, March 18, 2017
The Resistance Must Be Digitized
Over the past two months, millions of people have taken to the streets to challenge our nation’s authoritarian new president. From the women’s marches that took place across the country and around the world to the mass protests against the Muslim ban and immigration raids, people are resisting the...
Read more
Views
Saturday, February 21, 2015
Communities of Color Speak Out for Real Net Neutrality
A few years ago, the conventional wisdom in Washington was that communities of color oppose Net Neutrality. It wasn’t true then and it sure isn’t true today. Over the past two months, a number of events have further demonstrated that communities of color support strong open Internet protections. In...
Read more
The ACLU's Sandra Fulton, John and Bonnie Raines, and Free Press' Joseph Torres (Photo: Free Press) Views
Thursday, June 26, 2014
Surveillance Lessons from 1971 Still Resonate Today
Our nation has long used surveillance to control marginalized and dissident voices. It’s an issue my colleagues and I recently learned a great deal about from activists who exposed our nation’s shameful surveillance operations 40 years ago. And it’s an issue that’s relevant today given the...
Read more
Views
Saturday, February 11, 2012
The People’s Media
AT&T spared no expense in 2011 when it sought government approval of its $39 billion deal to acquire T-Mobile. The merger would have created a duopoly, leaving AT&T and Verizon in control of nearly 80 percent of the wireless market. AT&T would then have been able to set higher prices, at a cost to people on modest incomes who depend on their cell phones to connect with work, family, and the details of modern life.
Read more