Trader Joes Announces New Plan to Sell Only Sustainable Seafood by 2012

For Immediate Release

Contact: 

Bob Meyers, Photo Editor, (202) 319-2453; bob.meyers@greenpeace.org
Molly Dorozenski, Media Officer, (917) 864-3724; molly.dorozenski@greenpeace.org
Casson Trenor, Senior Markets Campaigner, (415) 255-9221 x340, casson.trenor@greenpeace.org

Trader Joes Announces New Plan to Sell Only Sustainable Seafood by 2012

Retailer removes red list species from shelves, calls for marine reserves

WASHINGTON - After enduring months of campaigning from Greenpeace activists
across the country, Trader Joe's has now made a significant move towards
addressing the sustainable seafood policy in their stores. In an
announcement posted on their website, Trader Joe's has publicly declared
their intentions to establish a policy, provide accurate information,
and remove some red list species from their shelves.

After enduring months of campaigning from Greenpeace activists across
the country, Trader Joe's has now made a significant move towards
addressing the sustainable seafood policy in their stores. In an
announcement posted on their website, Trader Joe's has publicly declared
their intentions to establish a policy, provide accurate information,
and remove some red list species from their shelves.

Trader Joes has agreed to:

  • Offer only sustainable seafood in their stores by December 31,
    2012.
  • Work with third-party, science-based organizations to establish
    definitions and parameters for addressing customer concerns about
    overfishing, destructive catch or production methods, and the importance
    of marine reserves.
  • Remove "red-listed" seafood from their shelves. Trader Joe's
    stopped selling Chilean Sea Bass in 2005, Orange Roughy in July of 2009,
    and Red Snapper in March of 2010.
  • Provide accurate information on all seafood labels, including
    species' Latin names, origin and catch or production method.
  • Use their buying power to leverage change in the seafood industry.

"We applaud Trader Joe's commitment to creating a strong sustainable
seafood policy. We are particularly happy to see Trader Joe's
acknowledge that we need marine reserves, and that species like Orange
Roughy and Chilean sea bass are incompatible with a sustainable seafood
operation. We know their customers will appreciate their recent
statement of intent. After all, seafood consumers deserve access to
transparent, accurate information about the products they choose," said
Senior Markets Campaigner Casson Trenor.

"We're going to be watching to see Trader Joe's implement these
changes," continued Trenor, "They've made a lot of strong promises, and
we'll be there to make sure that those promises become reality."

Trader Joe's is one of 20 seafood retailers profiled in Greenpeace's
sustainable seafood guide, Carting Away the Oceans, which is published
several times a year based on an analysis of sustainable seafood
policies and practices among major retailers. In the most recent
edition, Trader Joe's was ranked 17 out of 20, with a failing grade.
Based on the changes outlined above, Trader Joe's is expected to receive
a passing grade in the next report, tentatively scheduled for release
the week of April 26.
www.greenpeace.org/usa/press-center/reports4/carting-away-the-oceans

Of the 20 largest supermarket chains in the United States, eight have
still made no visible effort to increase the sustainability of their
seafood operations and continue to ignore scientific warnings about the
crisis facing global fisheries and the marine environment. These
include: Aldi, Costco, Giant Eagle, H.E.B., Meijer, Price Chopper,
Publix, and Winn Dixie. Despite the progress of many companies, all
continue to stock "red list" seafood like orange roughy, swordfish, or
Chilean sea bass - some of the world's most imperiled species. While
several retailers are working to make improvements, none of the
companies featured in the report can yet guarantee that their seafood is
legal, much less sustainable.

To help ensure the long-term sustainability of fisheries and marine
ecosystems, Greenpeace advocates the creation of a worldwide network of
marine reserves and a precautionary, ecosystem-based fisheries
management approach. Today, supermarkets can help the oceans and meet
consumer demand for sustainable products by refusing to sell seafood
from fisheries that:

  • Exploit endangered, vulnerable and/or protected species, or species
    with poor stock status;
  • Cause habitat destruction and/or lead to ecosystem alterations;
  • Cause negative impacts on other, non-target species;
  • Are unregulated, unreported, illegal or managed poorly, and cause
    negative impacts on local, fishing dependent communities.

For more information, visit http://www.traitorjoe.com or http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/news/trader-joe-greener

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