Trump’s First 100 Days are Marred by an Aggressive Anti-Worker Agenda

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Trump’s First 100 Days are Marred by an Aggressive Anti-Worker Agenda

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In a new report, EPI experts examine President Trump’s actions in his first 100 days analyzes their impact on the nation’s working people and on our economy.

The first 100 days outlines how President Trump has rolled back worker protections, proposed a budget that would dramatically cut funding for the agencies that safeguard workers’ rights, wages, and safety, and advanced nominees to key posts who are hostile to policies that boost wages, enhance workers’ bargaining power, and protect worker safety.


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“In his first 100 days in office, President Trump has continued to talk about creating ‘jobs where Americans prosper and grow.’ However, his actions during that time tell a different story,” said Celine McNicholas of EPI’s Perkins Project on Worker Rights and Wages. “Working Americans deserve more than talk. If the president were serious about improving the lives of working men and women, he could strengthen overtime rules, work to increase the minimum wage, and support workers’ rights to bargain collectively. Instead he has steadily undermined the laws and institutions that protect working people and advance their interests.”

Key actions taken in Trump’s first 100 days include:

  • Ensuring retirement savers will lose billions of dollars by delaying the “fiduciary rule” (day 15)
  • Putting workers at risk by delaying rules limiting their exposure to beryllium (day 41) and silica dust (day 77)
  • Rewarding federal contractors who violate labor and employment laws with the rollback of an Obama-era executive order (day 67)
  • Advancing two labor secretary nominees and a Supreme Court nominee who are hostile to workers’ rights and protections

The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank, was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic discourse.

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