Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

For Immediate Release

Press Release

Bread for the World Disappointed by Proposed Senate Cuts to Anti-Hunger Program

WASHINGTON -

Bread for the World is extremely disappointed that the Senate Agriculture Committee is recommending cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) as they negotiate the Farm Bill, which funds SNAP.   

“With nearly 49 million Americans struggling to put food on the table, now is not the time to make cuts to this vital program,” said Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World. “It will only make it more difficult for families to afford nutritious food and increase pressure on churches and charities that are already struggling to keep up with demand as the economy recovers.”

Nutrition programs funded through the Farm Bill weave a vital safety net that protect children, senior citizens, people with disabilities, and low-income working families from hunger and poor nutrition. Bread for the World appreciates the committee’s efforts to support investments in emergency food assistance, which will help food banks keep up with increased need, and to protect programs like the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program, which provides low-income students a fresh fruit or vegetable snack at school every day.

Bread for the World is pleased that the proposal includes common sense reforms to international food aid. For example, the Local and Regional Procurement Project, a pilot program in the 2008 farm bill, continues in this proposal as a full program. By purchasing from local farmers, the United States will help build up the agricultural capacity of developing countries.

Additionally, the bill would establish the Donald Payne Horn of Africa Resilience Program and incorporate provisions of the Donald Payne International Food Assistance Improvement Act of 2012.

“Moving forward in the Farm Bill process, we urge the Senate to create a circle of protection around programs like SNAP and international food aid that are vital to hungry and poor people in the United States and around the world,” said Beckmann.

Bread for the World recently launched its 2012 Offering of Letters campaign, which urges members of Congress to create a circle of protection around programs for hungry and poor people in this country and abroad. Within this broader campaign are four mini-campaigns that address specific legislative topics: domestic nutrition, poverty-focused foreign assistance, tax policy, and international food aid.

###

Bread for the World is a collective Christian voice urging our nation's
decision makers to end hunger at home and abroad. By changing policies,
programs and conditions that allow hunger and poverty to persist, we
provide help and opportunity far beyond the communities in which we
live.

Advocates Applaud as FTC Sues to Stop Microsoft-Activsion Mega-Merger

Biden's FTC, said one consumer campaigner, "is showing, once again, that it is serious about enforcing the law, reversing corporate concentration, and taking on the tough cases."

Brett Wilkins ·


Press Freedom Champions Renew Call for DOJ to Drop Charges Against Assange

"It is time for the Biden administration to break from the Trump administration's decision to indict Assange—a move that was hostile to the media and democracy itself."

Jessica Corbett ·


Oral Arguments Boost Fears of SCOTUS Buying Theory That Would 'Sow Elections Chaos'

"This reckless case out of North Carolina could explode the unifying understanding that power ultimately rests with the people of this country," one campaigner said of Moore v. Harper.

Jessica Corbett ·


War Industry 'Celebrating Christmas Early' as House Passes $858 Billion NDAA

"There is no justification to throw... $858 billion at the Pentagon when we're told we can't afford child tax credit expansion, universal paid leave, or other basic human necessities," said the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen. "End of story."

Brett Wilkins ·


GOP Florida Lawmaker Behind 'Don't Say Gay' Law Charged with Covid Relief Fraud

"It does not surprise me that someone who exploits queer kids for political gain would be charged with exploiting taxpayers for personal gain," said one Democratic state lawmaker.

Julia Conley ·

Common Dreams Logo