Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y) and Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) stand together during his campaign event at the Whittemore Center Arena on February 10, 2020 in Durham, New Hampshire. The state's Democratic primary is tomorrow. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y) and Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) stand together during his campaign event at the Whittemore Center Arena on February 10, 2020 in Durham, New Hampshire. The state's Democratic primary is tomorrow. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

At New Hampshire Rally, Sanders Calls on 7,500+ Supporters to 'Transform America' on Primary Day

"The one percent may be powerful, but there are a lot more people in the 99 percent."

Eoin Higgins, staff writer

Sen. Bernie Sanders exhorted what his campaign said was over 7,500 supporters at the University of New Hampshire's Whittemore Center in Durham, New Hampshire Monday night to get out the vote in the state's first-in-the-nation primary on Tuesday and bring the "Not me, us" movement to the White House in November's general election against the incumbent President Donald Trump.

"Donald Trump intends to win reelection by dividing color of skin, ethnic background, gender, and sexuality," said Sanders. "We are going to do exactly the opposite—we are going to bring our people together."

"We're coming together in the strongest grassroots movement in the history of American politics," Sanders thundered to deafening applause in the arena. The at-capacity crowd was the largest any candidate has recieved in New Hampshire this primary season—more than three times larger than a Sanders' rally at Keene State College on Sunday.

The senator addressed the crowd after an opening concert by Sunflower Bean and speeches by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, campaign co-chair Nina Turner, and others. 

"We have to nominate somebody with a political revolution at their back," said Ocasio-Cortez.

Turner said that Sanders represents a radical opportunity for the country, and called the senator a "champion." Referring to comments from centrist Democrats like James Carville questioning the practicality of Sanders' positions, Turner listed the challenges faced by the U.S. and told the crowd half measures were insufficient.

"If you're out in the middle of an ocean drowning, who do you want to save you?" Turner asked the crowd. "Someone who's practical, or someone who's radical?"

Education was a key part of Sanders' message as the senator called for teachers to receive salaries of at least $60,000 and for the end of student debt. The senator also emphasized his universal healthcare message, hit Wall Street and billionaires, and pushed for immediately addressing the climate crisis and ending mass incarceration. 

It was a closing argument for the senator, who hopes to have a significant showing in New Hampshire on Tuesday before he heads to the next early states Nevada and South Carolina. 

Sanders saw a boost in national polling numbers over the weekend and on Monday. As Common Dreams reported, a Quinnipiac University poll released Monday showed the senator taking a commanding lead nationally over his rivals and in a statistical tie for "electability" with former Vice President Joe Biden, whose numbers are falling after a fourth place finish in the Iowa caucuses. 

The senator asked the crowd to consider their place in history.

"The world is looking at you, New Hampshire," he said. "What you do will have international consequences—it defeats the most dangerous president in history but it also begins the movement to create an economy and government that works for all of us, not just the one percent."

"The one percent may be powerful, but there are a lot more people in the 99 percent," Sanders added. "Let's go forward, let's win this thing, and let's transform America."

After Sanders' remarks, much of the crowd stayed behind for a concert by rock band The Strokes, with supporters dancing in the aisles and even crowd-surfing in front of the stage.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.
We need your help.

Support progressive journalism.

Common Dreams is not your average news site. We don't survive on clicks or advertising dollars. We rely entirely on your support. And without it, our independent progressive journalism simply wouldn’t exist. Every gift of every amount matters.

Join the fight and support our common dreams today.

'A Deeply Dangerous Order': Trump-Appointed Judge Blocks Biden From Pausing New Oil Drilling Leases

"The judge's order turns a blind eye to runaway climate pollution that's devastating our planet."

Jake Johnson, staff writer ·


After Far-Right Marchers Chant 'Death to Arabs,' New Israeli Government Bombs Gaza

"The problem is bigger than Netanyahu—it's apartheid."

Jake Johnson, staff writer ·


Progressives, Big Tech Critics Celebrate Confirmation of Lina Khan as FTC Chair

"Her presence on the FTC marks the beginning of the end of an era of lawlessness for powerful corporations that they've enjoyed at the expense of workers, smaller businesses, and democracy."

Jessica Corbett, staff writer ·


'Our Democracy Hangs in the Balance': Calls Grow for Justice Breyer to Retire

"Democrats could lose our razor-thin majority in the Senate at any moment," warns Rep. Mondaire Jones. "It would be irresponsible to leave the future of our democracy up to chance."

Brett Wilkins, staff writer ·


Share of Fossil Fuels in Global Energy Mix 'Has Not Moved by an Inch' in a Decade

"We are waking up to the bitter reality that the climate policy promises over the past 10 years have mostly been empty words," said the executive director of REN21, which released the new report.

Jessica Corbett, staff writer ·