William Loren Katz

William Loren Katz is the author of Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage and forty other books. His website is: www.williamlkatz.com

Articles by this author

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Saturday, February 14, 2015
'The Birth of a Nation': A Century Later
By an odd coincidence the first week of Black History Month this February, Time magazine ran an article on the 100th anniversary of the first public showing of the movie classic The Birth of a Nation . This 22-reel, 3-hour and 10 minute silent film was Hollywood’s first blockbuster, first great...
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Saturday, October 11, 2014
Christopher Columbus Driven by Ill Winds
Columbus’s Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria were driven across the Atlantic by the same ill winds that from 1095 to 1272 launched nine Eruopean Crusades to capture Moslem Jerusalem. Defeated and humiliated the invaders suffered staggering human losses, left royal treasuries depleted, and convinced...
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Friday, June 13, 2014
The Forgotten Fight Against Fascism
In late 1944 as a high school senior I rushed off to a U.S. Navy recruiting station ready to take on world fascism. Cooler heads insisted I wait until my graduation in June. After boot camp I served in “The Pacific Theater”—Iwo Jima, Okinawa, Hawaii, Saipan, Japan, and the China Sea. Anyone who has...
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Wednesday, June 08, 2011
War? Bloodlust? What’s a Scholar to Do?
The New York Sunday Times on November 28, 2010 published noted historian Geoffrey C. Ward’s review of a biography of President Theodore Roosevelt [TR]. His review reveals something distressing about the way some of our scholars gloss over our iconic figures and write history as the U.S. fights multiple wars. A popular war hero, President for seven years, a prominent international figure [awarded the Nobel Peace Prize], arguably the man who built the U.S. overseas empire, TR’s brash aggressiveness has long made him Mount Rushmore in size and a favorite of school texts.
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Wednesday, February 15, 2006
Back to the Future: the US in Iraq and the Philippines
Critics of the United States occupation of Iraq usually find it analogous to the war in Vietnam, which cost 60,000 American lives, deeply divided the country and ended ignominiously. Certainly, White House rhetoric on Iraq recalls the government's talk during the Vietnam era of fighting tyranny and advancing freedom in Southeast Asia.
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Tuesday, October 19, 2004
What Goes Around Comes Around: A Tragedy and a Failure That Has Stimulated Terrorism
It will be 18 months ago this election eve, since President Bush on May 1, 2003, donned a flight jacket, landed on the carrier Abraham Lincoln and before a "Mission Accomplished" banner announced the end of "major combat" in Iraq. He proudly said: "The liberation of Iraq is a crucial advance in the campaign against terror. We have removed an ally of Al Qaeda and cut off a source of terrorist funding." Only 114 US service people had died in what an administration US official called "a slam-dunk" war.
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