John Buell

John Buell has a PhD in political science, taught for 10 years at College of the Atlantic, and was an Associate Editor of The Progressive for ten years. He lives in Southwest Harbor, Maine and writes on labor and environmental issues. His most recent book, published by Palgrave in August 2011, is "Politics, Religion, and Culture in an Anxious Age." He may be reached at jbuell@acadia.net

Articles by this author

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Thursday, December 22, 2016
Fake News and the New McCarthyism
One of the most potent worries about the coming Trump presidency is concern about free speech. Trump’s willingness to tolerate or even encourage violence against nonviolent critics of his agenda and personnel choices is alarming. The Washington Post recently carried a chilling cautionary tale about...
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Wednesday, November 02, 2016
Trade, Democracy, and the Politics of Backlash
One bit of good news came across my computer screen in the days leading up to the termination of this repellant campaign. It appeared that the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement between Canada and Europe (CETA) was headed for defeat. That good news was soon reversed as treaty advocates made...
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Monday, February 22, 2016
The Supreme Court’s Ultimate Coup: It Makes the Most Consequential Decisions
The death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia should be an occasion to re-examine one of his favorite themes: the intent of the Founding Fathers. In one sense, Scalia did serve their principles in his Citizens United decision. Frequent invocations of the Constitution by the corporate media in...
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Tuesday, May 19, 2015
Trans-Pacific Trade Deal Is Latest Threat to Our Democracy
Conservatives warn us that deficit spending will turn the U.S. into a fiscal basket case, like Greece. No longer truly independent, Greece is ruled by the IMF, the ECB, and the European Commission. What conservatives seldom point out is that membership in the Eurozone cost Greece control of its own...
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Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Why Myths of the "Free Market" Survive - And How To Resist Them
Fewer than half of the US population owns a single share of stock and even fewer Americans are in a position to start their own businesses. Nonetheless, at least in rhetoric this nation remains the land of the self-made man—and occasional woman. Many believe they still have the opportunity to be...
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(Photo: flickr / cc / Rawle C. Jackman) Views
Wednesday, July 02, 2014
Towards Full Employment and the Democratic Prospect
Despite all the talk about economic recovery, the US remains mired in slow growth and persistent unemployment. That we are far from full employment becomes clear if we recall recent history. During the final months of the Clinton Administration, unemployment dipped below 4% Those on the bottom of...
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Monday, March 17, 2014
Comcast Merger Threatens Our Democracy as Much as Our Pocketbooks
Much business news is pretty opaque to many citizens. Terms like leveraged buyouts, puts, and calla seem to be the stuff of expert financiers or con artists. Nonetheless, the media have recently reported a story that hits home for many. Number one Cable and broadcast conglomerate Comcast proposes to purchase number two Time Warner.
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Wednesday, February 19, 2014
NAFTA at 20: How ‘Free Trade’ Helps Banks Block Regulation
The North American Free Trade Agreement, just turned 20, has been in the news lately. Its advocates hope to extend its reach and depth through a Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement and similar deals with Europe.
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Thursday, October 31, 2013
Double or Nothing: The US is Making Escalating Bets
If life in the first two decades of the twenty first century were a game of poker, continuous double or nothing bets against the house by a wealthy participant would be routine. Life, however, is not a game, and the US is making escalating bets in the areas of finance, the environment, the international economy, and foreign relations. These systems pose significant risks in themselves, and their interactions with each other threaten to unleash positive feedback loops of indeterminate magnitude that may overwhelm us.
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Monday, July 08, 2013
Nationalism, Tech Giants, and Spy States
Despite persistent efforts by the US media to cast Edward Snowden as a traitor, the affair has managed to expose, not only abusive surveillance practices, but also the supportive role of strange bedfellows in these practices.
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