James Carroll

James Carroll

James Carroll, a TomDispatch regular and former Boston Globe columnist, is the author of 20 books, including the new novel The Cloister (Doubleday). Among other works are: House of War: The Pentagon and the Disastrous Rise of American Power and Christ Actually: The Son of God for the Secular Age. His memoir, An American Requiem, won the National Book Award. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He lives in Boston with his wife, the writer Alexandra Marshall.

 

Articles by this author

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Monday, March 13, 2006
Jill Carroll's Ordeal
How long is 10 weeks? How long is 65 days? How long is 1,560 hours? For Jill Carroll, the American journalist who was kidnapped in Iraq on Jan. 7, the passage of time must be excruciating.
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Monday, March 06, 2006
Bush, Lies, and Videotape
If George W. Bush were a character in a novel or a play, last week might have been the turning point in the narrative. He was shown on film being explicitly warned, just hours before Hurricane Katrina hit, that the levees in New Orleans were vulnerable.
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Monday, February 27, 2006
Civil War or Holy War?
''Fanaticism," William James wrote, ''is only loyalty carried to a convulsive extreme." Religious fanaticism was James's subject, and his reflection, published in ''The Varieties of Religious Experience" more than a hundred years ago, seems especially resonant now.
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Monday, February 20, 2006
Disease Takes Wing
If birds are not a friend to the human species, where in all of nature is friendship to be found? Each day come more reports of the dispersal of diseased poultry and fowl, moving from east to west, Asia into Europe, and alarms begin to sound. The grandeur of winged migration has become a niche for deadly disease. With the threat of avian flu comes a change in the way the flight of birds must strike the human eye.
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Monday, February 13, 2006
Misunderstanding Muslims
When the Koran was said to have been denigrated by American guards at Guantanamo last year, Muslims reacted with rage, but most observers in the West misunderstood why. It was easy for Christians and Jews -- the other ''people of the Book" -- to think that such an insult to the Koran was like an insult to the Bible. That would be sacrilege enough, but it was worse than that.
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Monday, January 23, 2006
The Human Face of Tragedy
Jill Carroll is no relation to me, yet it seems wrong to say that. I have followed the news of her plight as if she were my daughter, and for the weeks of her imprisonment, I have carried her in my heart. Now the clock is run out on the threat of those who hold her, and by the time you read this she may be dead. Yet, until word is final, hope remains. Meanwhile, what to make of the fate of Jill Carroll?
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Monday, January 16, 2006
The Dream and its Enemies
At the Richmond Theater on King Street in Alexandria, Va., I was cheerfully ushered into American complacency. ''Colored people" could go to the movies there, but they had to sit in the balcony.
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Tuesday, January 03, 2006
Invented Symbols
'Homo Sapiens is the species that invents symbols in which to invest passion and authority," Joyce Carol Oates once remarked, ''then forgets that symbols are inventions." This lesson applies across the human condition, although it shows up regularly in the realm of religion, where symbolism is the native language.
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Monday, December 26, 2005
Staying the Course
American intellegence was proving itself inadequate to the challenge. The president appointed a special commission to make recommendations. The year was 1954. The commission chairman was James Doolittle, the retired bomber general who had led the first air raid against Tokyo.
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Monday, November 28, 2005
Running Scared
When I was a boy, I delivered what was thought of as the afternoon newspaper, but in December I made my rounds in the dark. Always, at this time of year, I choke on one particular memory -- the frightened thrill of dashing through the last part of my paper route.
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