Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College and co-founder of 350.org. His most recent book is Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet.

Articles by this author

Views
Wednesday, February 25, 2009
Why I’ll Get Arrested To Stop the Burning of Coal
It may seem odd timing that many of us are heading to the nation's capital early next month for a major act of civil disobedience at a coal-fired power plant, the first big protest of its kind against global warming in this country.
Read more
Views
Wednesday, January 14, 2009
Greening The Stimulus
Bill McKibben:
Read more
Views
Monday, January 05, 2009
Think Again: Climate Change
"Scientists Are Divided" No, they're not. In the early years of the global warming debate, there was great controversy over whether the planet was warming, whether humans were the cause, and whether it would be a significant problem. That debate is long since over. Although the details of future forecasts remain unclear, there's no serious question about the general shape of what's to come.
Read more
Views
Tuesday, December 16, 2008
The Most Important Number on Earth
Sooner or later, you have to draw a line. We've spent the last 20 years in the opening scenes of what historians will one day call the Global Warming Era-the preamble to the biggest drama that humans have ever staged, the overture that hints at the themes that will follow for centuries to come. But none of the notes have resolved, none of the story lines yet come into clear view. And that's largely because until recently we didn't know quite where we were.
Read more
Views
Saturday, October 25, 2008
What the Next American Leader Needs to do to Deal with Global Warming
The election campaign has (unofficially) lasted almost two years. It's featured endless discussions on health care, the housing crisis, and who should get blamed for something their minister said. But when we elect a new leader, among his very first jobs will be figuring out how to deal with global warming. He almost certainly won't want it to rise to the top of his to-do list, but it will. He who comes next is the Climate Change President.
Read more
Views
Saturday, October 18, 2008
Green Fantasia
Thomas Friedman is the prime leading indicator of the conventional wisdom, always positioned just far enough ahead of the curve to give readers the sense that they're in-the-know, but never far enough to cause deep mental unease. He performs a useful service as a kind of political GPS unit, telling us where the country is, and could reasonably be expected to go. And this is his best book, more nuanced than his last, the best-selling The Earth Is Flat. But it needs to be viewed as a snapshot of the current dilemmas of policy, not as the oracle that it often aspires to be.
Read more
Views
Sunday, May 11, 2008
Civilization's Last Chance: The Planet Is Nearing a Tipping Point on Climate Change, and It Gets Much Worse, Fast
Even for Americans -- who are constitutionally convinced that there will always be a second act, and a third, and a do-over after that, and, if necessary, a little public repentance and forgiveness and a Brand New Start -- even for us, the world looks a little terminal right now.
Read more
Views
Friday, February 29, 2008
First, Step Up
At any given moment we face as a society an enormous number of problems: there's the mortgage crisis, the health care crisis, the endless war in Iraq, and on and on. Maybe we'll solve some of them, and doubtless new ones will spring up to take their places. But there's only one thing we're doing that will be easily visible from the moon. That something is global warming. Quite literally it's the biggest problem humans have ever faced, and while there are ways to at least start to deal with it, all of them rest on acknowledging just how large the challenge really is.
Read more
Views
Saturday, December 29, 2007
Gandhi: A Man for All Seasons
I spent the early summer of 2006 in India's most remote state, Arunachal Pradesh, a country of great beauty, remoteness and poverty bordering the Brahmaputra River as it descends from Tibet. Green, steamy country, rising up from the Assamese plain, filled with tea plantation and rice paddy at its lower elevations, and dense, tribally controlled jungle up high.
Read more
Views
Saturday, November 10, 2007
The Unsung Solution: What Rhymes With Waste-Heat Recovery?
From his desk in an office in Chicago, Jeff Smith has a bird's-eye view of the American landscape. Combing through a huge database of information compiled by the EPA, he can, almost literally, peer down every smokestack in the nation and figure out what's going on inside.And what he sees is heat. Waste heat-one of the country's largest potential sources of power, pouring up out of those smokestacks. If it could be recycled into electricity, that heat would generate immense amounts of power without our having to burn any new fossil fuels.
Read more

Pages