From Birth Control to Passports: Embattled Groups Prepare for Trump

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From Birth Control to Passports: Embattled Groups Prepare for Trump

Women, immigrants, people of color, Muslims, LGBTQ people, and others likely to suffer under looming right-wing administration share survival tips

A high school student protests Trump's victory in Berkeley, California, on Wednesday.

A high school student protests Trump's victory in Berkeley, California, on Wednesday. (Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Reuters)

Women, immigrants, disabled people, activists, people of color, journalists, and LGBTQ people are fearing for their rights—and in some cases, for their lives—as they face the coming Trump administration backed by a right-wing dominated U.S. House and Senate.

Indeed, as reports of hate-motivated attacks spike mere days after Donald Trump's shocking win, two open documents filled with survival tips for members of embattled communities are being shared countless times on social media, urging action before the January 20 inauguration.

The Google Drive documents—"Concrete Suggestions in Preparation for January" and "Oh shit! The what should I do before January guide"—were collectively created by rights advocates and members of these communities.

The tips and information range from the practical to the heartbreaking.

Both documents urge those insured by (the now threatened) Obamacare to visit their doctors for a wellness check-up, and one lists resources to learn about community-based conflict resolution while recommending the police be avoided, as many groups fear calling on an already militant police force that will only be further emboldened under Trump.

The advice taken all together paints a frightening picture of the potential ramifications of Trump's far-right administration, and the havoc it will wreak on vulnerable communities.

For example, one document urges people to "make copies of your passport, ID, etc and have them in a secure place outside of your apartment (friend, family, safe deposit box) should you need to leave your home quickly."

Both documents also warn that public benefits will likely be cut, or requirements to take part will become more stringent. Readers are recommended to research options to take part in community-supported agriculture programs from local farms, community gardening, food pantries, and to organize informal networks to share food.

"Now is a good time to seal, expunge, or otherwise clean up criminal records in preparation for more stringent benefits laws and federal programs," one document notes.

Women in particular are urged to arrange for long-acting birth control before the Obama administration—and Obamacare—ends. Some recommend getting IUDs, which can last as long as ten years, and people are also urged to purchase emergency contraception (such as Plan B) to have on hand before January 20.

Activists are encouraged to remove themselves from platforms such as Facebook ("Facebook is a known collaborator and conspirator with the FBI," the one document says), and to research communication apps that use end-to-end encryption, fearing the massive surveillance apparatus that Trump is about to inherit.

The documents also list extensive resources—on local and national levels—for suicide prevention, rape and sexual assault hotlines, and legal and civil rights groups.

People who don't belong to these threatened communities but want to support them are urged to offer emotional, logistical, and financial support to those who are facing particular oppression under a Trump presidency. Some have offered to take care of the costs associated with passport processing, for example, as having a passport makes it much easier to get other forms of ID.

"People in neighborhoods with large immigrant populations: ask your neighbors what you can do to make them feel welcome," one document reads.

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