Second Discovery of GMO Wheat Reveals 'Failed Policy' That Threatens Farmers: Watchdog

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Second Discovery of GMO Wheat Reveals 'Failed Policy' That Threatens Farmers: Watchdog

USDA says genetically engineered wheat discovered on Montana farm

"Coexistence between genetically engineered and non-genetically engineered crops is a failed policy that fundamentally cannot work," stated Andrew Kimbrell, executive director for Center for Food Safety. (Photo:  luke chan/flickr/cc)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday revealed that it was opening an investigation into the appearance of unapproved genetically engineered wheat in Montana.

It marks the second time the USDA is issuing notice of a discovery of rogue genetically engineered (or GMO) wheat. There is no commercially-approved GMO wheat.

According to a statement issued by the USDA, the discovery of the Roundup-resistant GMO wheat was made in July at Montana State University’s Southern Agricultural Research Center (SARC) in Huntley, Montana. That location was the site of Monsanto-led GMO wheat trials, approved by the USDA, from 2000 to 2003.

The agency stated that the GMO wheat found at the Montana site is different from the rogue GMO wheat spotted in 2013 on an 80-acre Oregon farm which was not the site of trial tests. That discovery sparked international backlash, with Japan and South Korea suspending some imports of U.S. wheat and the European Union calling for more testing of U.S. wheat. It also sparked a class action lawsuit by U.S. wheat farmers against Monsanto, charging that the GMO wheat finding caused them economic damage.

In the same announcement issued Friday, the USDA states that it is ending the investigation into the Oregon GMO wheat discovery, stating that it "appears to be an isolated incident," and that the Oregon wheat is "significantly different" from the Montana wheat.

It states that there is no evidence that there is now GMO wheat in commerce and that it is unclear how the GMO wheat ended up on the Oregon farm.

Watchdog group Center for Food Safety, however, charges that the new discovery poses a threat to farmers and should be a call to stop open-air field trials.

"Once again, USDA and the biotech industry have put farmers and the food supply at risk," Andrew Kimbrell, executive director for Center for Food Safety, said in a statement. "Coexistence between genetically engineered and non-genetically engineered crops is a failed policy that fundamentally cannot work. Genetic contamination is a serious threat to farmers across the country."

"USDA cannot keep treating these as isolated incidents; contamination is the inevitable outcome of GMO crop technology," he added. "USDA should, at a minimum, immediately place a moratorium on open-air field testing of genetically engineered crops."

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