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Jeff Bezos laughs as he speaks about his flight on Blue Origin’s New Shepard into space during a press conference on July 20, 2021 in Van Horn, Texas. Mr. Bezos and the crew that flew with him were the first human spaceflight for the company. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Extreme Wealth Concentration: Billionaire Space Race Is a Wake-up Call

Bored billionaires want tax breaks to escape a planet they helped pollute. Should we even let them back?

Sam Pizzigati

 by OtherWords

Three of the richest billionaires on Earth are now spending billions to exit Earth's atmosphere and enter into space. The world is watching—and reflecting.

Some charmed commentators say the billionaires racing into space aren't just thrilling humankind—they're uplifting us. The technologies they develop "could benefit people worldwide far into the future," says Yahoo Finance's Daniel Howley.

We don't only get billionaires when wealth concentrates. We get a society that revolves around the egos of the most affluent and an economy where the needs of average people don't particularly matter.

But most commentators seem to be taking a considerably more skeptical perspective.

They're dismissing the space antics of Branson, Bezos, and Musk as the ego trips of bored billionaires—"cynical stunts by disgustingly rich businessmen," as one British analyst puts it, "to boost their self-importance at a time when money and resources are desperately needed elsewhere."

"Space travel used to be about 'us,' a collective effort by the country to reach beyond previously unreachable limits," writes author William Rivers Pitt. "Now, it's about 'them,' the 0.1 percent."

The best of these skeptical commentators can even make us laugh.

"Really, billionaires?" comedian Seth Meyers asked earlier this month. "This is what you're going to do with your unprecedented fortunes and influence? Drag race to outer space?"

Let's enjoy the ridicule. But let's not treat the billionaire space race as a laughing matter.

Let's see it as a wake-up call—a reminder that we don't only get billionaires when wealth concentrates. We get a society that revolves around the egos of the most affluent and an economy where the needs of average people don't particularly matter.

Characters like Elon Musk, notes Paris Max, host of the Tech Won't Save Us podcast, are using "misleading narratives about space to fuel public excitement" and gain tax-dollar support for various projects "designed to work best—if not exclusively—for the elite."

The three corporate space shells for Musk, Bezos, and Branson—SpaceX, Blue Origin, and Virgin Galactic—have "all benefited greatly through partnerships with NASA and the U.S. military," notes CNN Business. Their common corporate goal: to get satellites, people, and cargo "into space cheaper and quicker than has been possible in decades past."

Branson is hawking tickets for roundtrips "to the edge of the atmosphere and back" at $250,000 per head. He's planning some 400 such trips a year, observes British journalist Oliver Bullough, about "almost as bad an idea as racing to see who can burn the rainforest quickest."

The annual UN Emissions Gap Report last year concluded that the world's richest 1 percent do more to foul the atmosphere than the entire poorest 50 percent combined. Opening space to rich people's joyrides would stomp that footprint even bigger.

Bezos and Musk seem to have grander dreams than mere space tourism—they're looking to colonize space. They see space as a refuge from an increasingly inhospitable planet Earth. And they expect tax-dollar support to make their various pipedreams come true.

How should we respond to all this?

We should, of course, be working to create a more hospitable planet for all humanity. In the meantime, advocates are circulating tongue-in-cheek petitions that urge terrestrial authorities not to let orbiting billionaires back on Earth.

"Billionaires should not exist…on Earth or in space, but should they decide the latter, they should stay there," reads one Change.org petition nearing 200,000 signatures.

Ric Geiger, the 31-year-old automotive supplies account manager behind that effort, is hoping his petition helps the issue of maldistributed wealth "reach a broader platform."

Activists like Geiger are going down the right track. We don't need billionaires to "conquer space." We need to conquer inequality.


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License.
Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati, veteran labor journalist and Institute for Policy Studies associate fellow, edits Inequality.org. His recent books include: "The Case for a Maximum Wage" (2018) and "The Rich Don't Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph over Plutocracy that Created the American Middle Class, 1900-1970"(2012).

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