For Immediate Release

Organization Profile: 
Contact: 

Eddie Vale (202) 637-5279;
Nora Frederickson (202) 637-5212

Working America Unveils Campaign to Organize & Mobilize Unemployed Voters

WASHINGTON - Working America is launching a campaign that will organize &
mobilize hundreds of thousands of unemployed workers across the nation
for the November elections. The campaign will engage unemployed Working
America members who are registered voters by reaching out to them in
their homes, on the street and in unemployment offices, with the goal of
rallying voters around the crucial issues of jobs and trade.

"Millions of people are unemployed and underemployed, and millions
more are worried about the future. Twenty-five percent of Working
America members who are working are afraid they will lose their jobs,"
said Karen Nussbaum, director of Working America. "Yet some politicians
are willing to play politics with the survival of unemployed workers and
their families.  We'll make sure that unemployed workers get out and
vote, and that they know the records of the candidates on issues like
extending unemployment insurance, investing in jobs and preventing
outsourcing."

Over this past year, Working America has spoken to over 25,000 people
a week about jobs and the economy through door-to-door canvasses. The
organization is stepping up its field mobilization efforts in the fall
with a tele-town hall that will reach 20,000 unemployed voters across
the country to talk about unemployment, job creation and the November
elections.

Working America is mobilizing unemployed voters through a combination
of face-to-face and mail campaigns. In addition to talking to everyday
voters on the streets, field organizers in 12 cities are talking to
unemployed workers at unemployment offices and job training facilities.
Workers at these facilities will have the chance to fill out "Help
Wanted" petitions to send to Congress asking them what they've done to
create jobs and help unemployed workers. Working America organizers are
also reaching out to members by mail and phone to pledge to vote in the
November elections.

Working America is encouraging unemployed voters to reach out to each
other by hosting a "Pledge to Vote" postcard campaign in September.
Workers in several cities will organize parties where they will write
personal notes to other unemployed voters, encouraging them to vote the
right way to create jobs. The goal is to provide workers with a unique
opportunity to come together, share their stories, and take action.  

Working America also manages the Unemployment Lifeline
(www.unemploymentlifeline.com), an online site that unemployed workers
can use to communicate with other unemployed workers and access vital
local and national resources, such as listings for local unemployment
offices, childcare and healthcare facilities.  And starting in October,
workers will be able to use the Job Tracker, an online resource provided
by Working America, to look up companies in their towns that are
outsourcing jobs, endangering their workers, or violating their rights
at work.

Working America, community affiliate of the AFL-CIO, represents
working families to mobilize around economic issues like health care and
good jobs. Working America represents 3 million people and is the
fastest-growing organization for working people in the country. For more
information, go to
www.workingamerica.org.

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The American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) works tirelessly to improve the lives of working people. We are the democratic, voluntary federation of 56 national and international labor unions that represent 12.5 million working men and women.

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