Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and NDP leader Jagmeet Singh

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (L) and New Democratic Party Leader Jagmeet Singh participate in a debate in Gatineau, Quebec, Canada on September 9, 2021. (Photo: Adrian Wyld/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

NDP Expected to Wield Power in Canadian Parliament as Trudeau Maintains Minority Govt

"We are going to continue fighting for you, just the same way we fought for you in the pandemic, you can count on us to continue those fights," said NDP leader Jagmeet Singh.

Julia Conley

The leader of Canada's left-wing New Democratic Party, Jagmeet Singh, responded to Monday night's snap election results with a pledge to continue fighting for climate action and far-reaching social reforms aimed at helping working families, as his party gained three seats in Parliament, putting its total at 27 as of this writing.
 
While holding fewer seats than Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party, the Conservatives, and the separatist Bloc Québécois, the New Democratic Party (NDP) will likely wield power in the new government as the Liberals rely on progressive lawmakers' votes to pass key legislation.

"In this pandemic, people got more help because we were there, we were able to increase the supports to people. If people want more help, more New Democrats will make it happen."
—Jagmeet Singh, NDP

 
"I want you to know our fight for you will continue," Singh told supporters after the votes were tallied Monday night. "You can be sure that we will be there for you, and you can also be sure that if we work together we can build a better society, and that's exactly what New Democrats will do."
 
The three seats the NDP picked up included a victory by Blake Desjarlais, who defeated a Conservative incumbent in Edmonton and doubled the party's seats in Alberta. The party had focused on the seat as a major target after the NDP came in second in Edmonton in 2019. Desjarlais will be Alberta's only Indigenous member of Parliament (MP).
 

Singh was also re-elected in Burnaby South, British Columbia. According to the CBC's Vote Compass, Singh was rated highest among all federal party leaders in competence and trustworthiness.

After Trudeau called for the snap election in mid-August, hoping to gain ground in Parliament by campaigning on his government's management of the coronavirus pandemic, Singh and the NDP pushed its message calling for higher taxes on corporations and the rich, universal prescription drug coverage, more ambitious climate targets than the Liberals have achieved, and other far-reaching policy changes.

The party pledged to "set a target of reducing Canada's emissions by at least 50% from 2005 levels by 2030, reaching further wherever possible to account for Canada's fair share," in contrast with recently passed legislation to reach net-zero emissions by 2050.

"We are going to continue fighting for you, just the same way we fought for you in the pandemic, you can count on us to continue those fights," Singh said Monday night. "We're going to make sure that we fight hard to defend our environment, to make sure we're fighting the climate crisis like we really want to win."

After calling for an election that many political observers saw as a risk, Trudeau will remain as prime minister but is expected to preside over a minority government, with the Liberals holding 158 seats in Parliament—one fewer than it won in 2019 and 12 short of the 170-seat threshold needed for a majority.

Canadian historian Christo Aivalis outlined some far-reaching and broadly popular legislative actions Trudeau could take promptly, working closely with Singh's party.

"All of this can start day one of a new Parliament," Aivalis said.

Trudeau is likely to rely on votes from the NDP to pass some of his signature policy pledges, including a national child care plan.

Singh pointed to his party's Covid-19 response—including pushing provincial governments to protect renters from evictions and support small businesses—as evidence that the NDP will continue working in the best interest of all Canadians following the elections.

"In this pandemic, people got more help because we were there, we were able to increase the supports to people," Singh said ahead of the elections. "If people want more help, more New Democrats will make it happen."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

We've had enough. The 1% own and operate the corporate media. They are doing everything they can to defend the status quo, squash dissent and protect the wealthy and the powerful. The Common Dreams media model is different. We cover the news that matters to the 99%. Our mission? To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. Thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Can you chip in? We can't do it without you. Thank you.

Warren, Sanders, and Others Blast Biden's 'Failure' on Federal Cannabis Policy

While commending Biden's pardons and commutations, six senators wrote that "much more has to be done to address the racist and harmful legacy of cannabis policies on Black and Brown communities."

Jessica Corbett ·


'Broken' Capitalist Food System Drives Soaring Global Hunger: Oxfam

Criticism from the charity's food policy director came in response to a new United Nations report revealing that around 1 in 10 people worldwide went hungry last year.

Brett Wilkins ·


With Manchin's Backing, Senate Dems Unveil Plan to Let Medicare Negotiate Drug Prices

"This compromise will lower prices, cut costs, and stop the drug corporations from raising their prices faster than the rate of inflation," said Margarida Jorge of Lower Drug Prices Now.

Jake Johnson ·


'Fight for Us Goddamnit': Frustration Grows Over Biden Fecklessness Amid GOP Destruction

"We simply cannot make promises, hector people to vote, and then refuse to use our full power when they do," said Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Julia Conley ·


EPA Likely Underestimating Amount of Toxic Forever Chemicals in US Water: Analysis

"The EPA is doing the bare minimum it can and that's putting people's health at risk," said the policy director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility.

Kenny Stancil ·

Common Dreams Logo