Skip to main content

Common Dreams. Journalism funded by people, not corporations.

There has never been—and never will be—an advertisement on our site except for this one: without readers like you supporting our work, we wouldn't exist.

No corporate influence. No pay-wall. Independent news and opinion 365 days a year that is freely available to all and funded by those who support our mission: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good.

Our mission is clear. Our model is simple. If you can, please support our Fall Campaign today.

Support Our Work -- No corporate influence. No pay-wall. Independent news funded by those who support our mission: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. Please support our Fall Campaign today.

Teresa Bo, a senior correspondent for Al-Jazeera was sprayed directly in the face—clearly "on purpose," she says—while covering anti-coup demonstrators in the city of La Paz, Bolivia on Friday, November 15, 2019. (Photo: Al-Jazeera/Screenshot)

Teresa Bo, a senior correspondent for Al-Jazeera was sprayed directly in the face—clearly "on purpose," she says—while covering anti-coup demonstrators in the city of La Paz, Bolivia on Friday, November 15, 2019. (Photo: Al-Jazeera/Screenshot)

Police in Bolivia Pepper Spray Journalist 'On Purpose' During Live Coverage of Anti-Coup Protests

"I hate to be the story because we are here to report on what is happening to the people in the amazing country," said Al-Jazeera English senior correspondent Teresa Bo. "I hope it helps denounce that such practices cannot be tolerated. Not here not anywhere."

Jon Queally

Becoming part of the story she was seeking to cover, international news correspondent Teresa Bo was assaulted by Bolivian state security forces on Friday—shot directly in the face, while on camera, with tear gas or pepper spray.

Perpetrated while she was reporting for Al-Jazeera English in the city of La Paz—where ongoing streets protests erupted this week after a coup forced the resignation of the nation's president Evo Morales—the attack on Bo, which occurred while she was giving an on-camera account of the protests, was caught on film.

"I was just thrown tear gas by the police, on purpose," Bo reports in the segment. "This is what is happening in the middle of a plaza where people have been protesting peacefully. A police officer just threw tear gas in my eyes. It is extremely difficult to speak. Very, very sorry."

Despite the pain, Bo continues to report the scene and explains that the nearby protesters were clashing with security forces—who can be seen firing tear gas canisters in the background—in an effort to reach the nearby presidential palace.

While Bo in the immediate aftermath of the attack calls the substance tear gas, many noted that the substance was more likely pepper spray.

The street protests in Bolivia have grown larger and more violent this week, with massive demonstrations in cities across the country on Friday. As Common Dreams reported, security forces opened fire on a large crowd of mostly indigenous protesters in the city of Cochabamba on Friday afternoon sending many hundreds of people fleeing for their lives. Numerous people were reported killed and scores more injured.

The assault on Bo, said U.S. journalist Ryan Grim of The Intercept, revealed the correspondent's "impressive" grit—as she continued with her reporting despite the volatile chemicals burning her face and eyes—but also helped reveal "what's going on" in Bolivia.

In response to the footage, artist and progressive activist Molly Crabapple—with a sarcastic bite at those who have argued that the overthrow of Morales was not, in fact, a coup—tweeted: "The police of the totally not a coup regime in Bolivia sprayed tear gas into a female journalist's face because she was reporting on their violent suppression of anti-coup protests."

"Thanks so much to those who understand we are only doing our job," Bo tweeted after the video of the attack spread, with many thanking her online for her brave journalism.

"I hate to be the story because we are here to report on what is happening to the people in the amazing country," Bo said. "I hope it helps denounce that such practices cannot be tolerated. Not here not anywhere."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

This is the world we live in. This is the world we cover.

Because of people like you, another world is possible. There are many battles to be won, but we will battle them together—all of us. Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We don't survive on clicks. We don't want advertising dollars. We want the world to be a better place. But we can't do it alone. It doesn't work that way. We need you. If you can help today—because every gift of every size matters—please do. Without Your Support We Simply Don't Exist.

'Outrageous and Shameful': Dems May Cut Paid Leave Due to Manchin's Opposition

Decrying the plan, advocacy groups vowed that "the American people are not going to allow that essential human need to be ignored and negotiated away behind closed doors."

Jessica Corbett ·


Open Letter Warns Trump's 'Big Lie' GOP Poses Existential Threat to Democracy

"Now is the time for leaders in all walks of life—for citizens of all political backgrounds and persuasions—to come to the aid of the republic."

Brett Wilkins ·


Ahead of Historic House Hearing, Fresh Big Oil Misinformation Campaign Exposed

"It's always helpful to remember that big fossil fuel companies (besides being overwhelmingly responsible for carbon pollution) are also skeevy disinformation hucksters."

Jessica Corbett ·


'Very Welcome' Progress as Iran Agrees to Restart Talks on Nuclear Deal Sabotaged by Trump

One peace advocate urged all sides to reconvene negotiations "as soon as possible and with renewed urgency" to avert "disastrous" consequences for Iran and the world.

Brett Wilkins ·


House Progressives: 'When We Said These Two Bills Go Together, We Meant It'

"Moving the infrastructure bill forward without the popular Build Back Better Act risks leaving behind working people, families, and our communities."

Andrea Germanos ·

Support our work.

We are independent, non-profit, advertising-free and 100% reader supported.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values.
Direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to our Newsletter.


Common Dreams, Inc. Founded 1997. Registered 501(c3) Non-Profit | Privacy Policy
Common Dreams Logo