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As Critics Obsess Over Her Finances, Ocasio-Cortez Urges Media to Focus on Issue 'Actually Worth Airtime': Low-Wage Jobs

"While we‘re discussing personal finances," says newly-elected progressive, "Trump's tax dodges represent millions of dollars taken from schoolchildren, teachers, firehouses, senior centers, and more."

New York U.S. House candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks at a progressive fundraiser on August 2, 2018 in Los Angeles. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

New York U.S. House candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks at a progressive fundraiser on August 2, 2018 in Los Angeles. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez continued to shoot back at those who draw attention to—and criticize—the amount in her savings account by calling for coverage instead of far more worthy issues—the nation's pervasive low-wage jobs and President Donald Trump's "public theft"—and accusing some sitting congresspeople of lashing out at her because they are blinded by privilege, and thus unable to represent their constituents.

The latest push-back follows a CNBC report in which Corbin Trent, Ocasio-Cortez's director of communications, said the newly-elected progressive Democrat had "well below $7,000" in her savings account. The news report also included comments from financial experts who said someone of her age should have between $8,750 and $30,000 in savings and at least $27,000 tucked away for retirement—amounts some derided as "unrealistic" for millennials given burdensome student loan debt, low wages, and high housing prices.

Ocasio-Cortez tweeted late Tuesday night:

In another tweet, Ocasio-Cortez pointed to what she sees as the real "fear" motivating the intense look at her bank account and what her wardrobe costs:

According reporter Leah Fessler, critics' continued attention on Ocasio-Cortez's finances is a backfire.  What they "still don't understand," she writes at Quartz, "is that their focus on how she doesn't meet their expectations only amplifies her power—and deepens her connection to the young, ambitious, working- and middle-class Americans who see her as their representative on the national stage."

Some of those Americans took to Twitter to make that connection clear:

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