Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

Today is the LAST DAY of this Mid-Year Campaign. This is our hour of need.
If you value independent journalism, please support Common Dreams.

TODAY is the last day to meet our goal -- Join the small group of generous readers who donate, keeping Common Dreams free for millions of people each year.

A Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) emergency room in Aden, Yemen. The medical charity has been forced to pull its staff from six facilities because of the Saudi-led war. (Photo: Guillaume Binet/MYOP via MSF.org)

Demanding End to Saudi Arabia's "Blank Check" for Atrocities, Sanders to Give Senate Yet Another Chance to Stop US Complicity in Yemen Massacre

"The recent disappearance and likely assassination of Jamal Khashoggi only underscores how urgent it has become for the United States to redefine our relationship with Saudi Arabia."

Jake Johnson

Months before Saudi Arabia was accused of sending a murder team to torture and assassinate Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the United States Senate had an opportunity to withdraw American military support for the kingdom's vicious, years-long assault on Yemen—but 45 Republicans and 10 Democrats joined hands to squander it.

"I plan to give the Senate another chance to vote on my resolution to end our support for the war in Yemen, to reassert congressional authority over matters of war, and to show the Saudis that they do not have a blank check to continue human rights violations."
—Sen. Bernie Sanders
However, now that the Saudis' latest atrocity has garnered international outrage and once more placed the spotlight on the brutal regime's disdain for human rights, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) announced on Monday that he plans to reintroduce his resolution to bring an immediate halt to U.S. complicity in Saudi Arabia's massacre of Yemeni civilians, with the goal of forcing senators who have expressed fury at Khashoggi's murder to finally act on their indignant words.

"The Saudi-led war in Yemen has become the world's largest humanitarian disaster. The recent disappearance and likely assassination of Jamal Khashoggi only underscores how urgent it has become for the United States to redefine our relationship with Saudi Arabia," Sanders wrote on Twitter. "Next month, I plan to give the Senate another chance to vote on my resolution to end our support for the war in Yemen, to reassert congressional authority over matters of war, and to show the Saudis that they do not have a blank check to continue human rights violations."

Sanders' announcement came just before CNN reported on Monday that the Saudis are preparing to admit for the first time that Khashoggi was killed, but they will insist that the killing was the accidental result of a botched "interrogation."

Critics immediately cast doubt on the report, which is still in a preliminary stage:

As Common Dreams reported, the United Nations warned on Monday that if the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia continue their relentless attack on Yemen—which has been bolstered by bombs manufactured in the U.S. as well as American intelligence—Yemenis could soon face "the worst famine in the world in 100 years."

"We predict that we could be looking at 12 to 13 million innocent civilians who are at risk of dying from the lack of food," warned Lise Grande, chief of the U.N.'s diplomatic mission in Yemen.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

TODAY is the last day of our crucial Mid-Year Campaign and we might not make it without your help.
Who funds our independent journalism? Readers like you who believe in our mission: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. No corporate advertisers. No billionaire founder. Our non-partisan, nonprofit media model has only one source of revenue: The people who read and value this work and our mission. That's it.
And the model is simple: If everyone just gives whatever amount they can afford and think is reasonable—$3, $9, $29, or more—we can continue. If not enough do, we go dark.

All the small gifts add up to something otherwise impossible. Please join us today. Donate to Common Dreams. This is crunch time. We need you now.

Texas Supreme Court Allows Century-Old Abortion Ban to Take Effect

"Extremist politicians are on a crusade to force Texans into pregnancy and childbirth against their will, no matter how devastating the consequences."

Jake Johnson ·


'What's There to Even Discuss?' Omar Says Free, Universal School Meals Should Be Permanent

"We have an opportunity to prove that a government of the people, by the people, and for the people can still deliver big things. And we can feed tens of millions of hungry kids while we do it."

Jake Johnson ·


'Stark Betrayal': Biden Administration Floats New Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling

"This is the third time since November the Biden administration has announced new oil and gas leasing plans on the Friday before a holiday," said one climate advocate. "They're ashamed, and they should be."

Jake Johnson ·


As US Rolls Back Reproductive Rights, Sierra Leone Moves to Decriminalize Abortion

"I'm hopeful today's announcement gives activists in the U.S., and especially Black women given the shared history, a restored faith that change is possible and progress can be made."

Brett Wilkins ·


'Indefensible': Outrage as New Reporting Shines Light on Biden Deal With McConnell

The president has reportedly agreed to nominate an anti-abortion Republican to a lifetime judgeship. In exchange, McConnell has vowed to stop blocking two Biden picks for term-limited U.S. attorney posts.

Jake Johnson ·

Common Dreams Logo