Skip to main content

Common Dreams. Journalism funded by people, not corporations.

There has never been—and never will be—an advertisement on our site except for this one: without readers like you supporting our work, we wouldn't exist.

No corporate influence. No pay-wall. Independent news and opinion 365 days a year that is freely available to all and funded by those who support our mission: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good.

Our mission is clear. Our model is simple. If you can, please support our Fall Campaign today.

Support Our Work -- No corporate influence. No pay-wall. Independent news funded by those who support our mission: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. Please support our Fall Campaign today.

Billionaire Tom Steyer is pouring $110 million into the midterm elections, supporting progressive ballot initiatives and voter registration. (Photo: Fortune Live Media/Flickr/cc)

Bypassing Democratic Party, Billionaire Tom Steyer Pours $110 Million into Impeach Trump and Get-Out-the-Vote Organizing

Claiming a larger base of support than the NRA, Steyer's political action committees aim to register young voters and engage with Americans who don't often go to the polls

Julia Conley

Investing in the promotion of issues and strategies that too many establishment Democratic leaders have avoided, billionaire hedge fund manager and activist Tom Steyer announced plans this week to pour $110 million into the 2018 midterm elections with the intent of unseating as many Republicans in Congress as possible and weakening President Donald Trump's hold on power.

Instead of giving money to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and Democratic National Committee (DNC), as detailed in a profile by Politico on Tuesday, Steyer is investing in an aggressive push to register thousands of young voters and engage with like-minded Americans on issues that he believes will drive them to the polls—including the possibility of impeaching Trump once Democrats win majorities in Congress.

While Democratic lawmakers including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) have shied away from advocating for impeachment, calling the initiative "premature," polls commissioned by Steyer have found that 59 percent of voters wanted candidates to talk about bringing charges against the president.

Meanwhile, Republican voters polled by Steyer did not express concern that Trump could be impeached if Democrats win the Senate and House.

"There's all this concern in Washington that impeachment is going to rile up Republicans, but our numbers show the opposite. ...It's time to get past the establishment talking points and get to what's really going to win elections," Kevin Mack, lead strategist for Steyer's political action group Need to Impeach, told Politico.

Steyer's other nonprofit group, NextGen America, will focus its resources from the billionaire's new investment on registering thousands of young voters on about 400 college campuses across the country.

NextGen's deputy press secretary, Will Simons, shared some of group's strategy for urging young Americans to vote in November.

Steyer has also donated large sums to progressive ballot initiatives and specific candidates. NextGen spent $500,000 on a digital ad campaign and contributed another  $500,000 to the political action committee of Andrew Gillum, a Democrat running for governor of Florida who has spoken out in support of Medicare for All, and has bankrolled renewable energy ballot measures in Arizona and Nevada.

The millions of dollars Steyer is pouring into Need to Impeach will go towards phone-banking, emailing, and on-the-ground field organizing efforts, as well as anti-Trump ads that will continue to run in contested districts until November.

The organization already has the attention of many voters who rarely go to the polls, according to Politico:

The Need to Impeach email list alone has already topped 5.5 million, which their research—anyone who signs up with the effort has their information run through a series of voter files and other databases—shows includes a very exact 697,780 infrequent voters in the 63 most competitive House districts.

"Our list is bigger than the NRA's—and we're going to make sure that it votes that way in 2018," Mack said.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

This is the world we live in. This is the world we cover.

Because of people like you, another world is possible. There are many battles to be won, but we will battle them together—all of us. Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We don't survive on clicks. We don't want advertising dollars. We want the world to be a better place. But we can't do it alone. It doesn't work that way. We need you. If you can help today—because every gift of every size matters—please do. Without Your Support We Simply Don't Exist.

Watch: Bernie Sanders Argues 'We Must End the Greed of Big Pharma'

The live address comes as the Senate Budget Committee chair continues to push for including Medicare expansion and drug pricing reforms in the Build Back Better package.

Common Dreams staff ·


Reconciliation Framework 'Not Enough' to Push Through Infrastructure Bill, Progressives Warn

"We need to have a vote ready for the Build Back Better plan, not a framework," insisted Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. "We want to have both of these votes together."

Brett Wilkins ·


McDonald's Workers Join 'Striketober' and Walk Out Over Sexual Harassment

One striker participated because "McDonald's still refuses to take responsibility for the countless women and teenagers who face harassment on the job at its stores across the globe."

Jessica Corbett ·


Breaking: FDA Panel Recommends Pfizer Covid-19 Vaccine for Kids 5 to 11

With just one abstention, the advisory panel voted 17-0 to approve the vaccine for younger children which scientific review has deemed both safe and effective against the deadly virus.

Common Dreams staff ·


Support our work.

We are independent, non-profit, advertising-free and 100% reader supported.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values.
Direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to our Newsletter.


Common Dreams, Inc. Founded 1997. Registered 501(c3) Non-Profit | Privacy Policy
Common Dreams Logo