Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

Dear Common Dreams Readers:
Corporations and billionaires have their own media. Shouldn't we? When you “follow the money” that funds our independent journalism, it all leads back to this: people like you. Our supporters are what allows us to produce journalism in the public interest that is beholden only to people, our planet, and the common good. Please support our Mid-Year Campaign so that we always have a newsroom for the people that is funded by the people. Thank you for your support. --Jon Queally, managing editor

Join the small group of generous readers who donate, keeping Common Dreams free for millions of people each year. Without your help, we won’t survive.

Realizing Worst Fears of Peace Groups, Trump's Nuclear Posture Review Urges Expanded Use of World's Deadliest Weapons

"Who let Dr. Strangelove write the Nuclear Posture Review?"

Julia Conley

People hold up signs during a protest calling for the Trump administration to continue diplomacy with Iran near the White House in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 12. (Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

The Pentagon's official outline for its use of nuclear force was denounced as "radical" and "extreme" by prominent anti-nuclear weapons groups when it was released Friday afternoon—confirming peace advocates' worst fears that the Trump administration would seek to expand the use of nuclear force.

"Who in their right mind thinks we should expand the list of scenarios in which we might launch nuclear weapons?" asked Peace Action in a statement. "Who let Dr. Strangelove write the Nuclear Posture Review?"

The Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) calls for the development of smaller warheads that the military believes would be seen as more "usable" against other nations.

"The risk of use for nuclear weapons has always been unacceptably high. The new Trump Nuclear Doctrine is to deliberately increase that risk."—Beatrice Fihn, ICAN

"In support of a strong and credible nuclear deterrent, the United States must...maintain a nuclear force with a diverse, flexible range of nuclear yield and delivery modes that are ready, capable, and credible," reads the report, which serves as the first updated document the U.S. has released regarding its perceived nuclear threats since 2010.

In addition to "diversifying" its nuclear arsenal, the Pentagon notes that it will seek to "expand the range of credible U.S. options for responding to nuclear or non-nuclear strategic attack," raising concerns that President Donald Trump will argue for the use of nuclear force as a deterrent—a significant departure from previous administrations which saw nuclear weapons as an option only for retaliation.

"The risk of use for nuclear weapons has always been unacceptably high," said Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN). "The new Trump Nuclear Doctrine is to deliberately increase that risk. It is an all-out attempt to take nuclear weapons out of the silos and onto the battlefield. This policy is a shift from one where the use of nuclear weapons is possible to one where the use of nuclear weapons is likely."

Derek Johnson, head of Global Zero, called the NPR "a radical plan written by extreme elements and nuclear ideologues in Trump's inner circle who believe nuclear weapons are a wonder drug that can solve our national security challenges."

"Trump's insistence that we need more and better weapons is already spurring countries to follow in his footsteps," he added. "Nuclear arms-racing is a steep and slippery slope; we'd do well to learn the lessons of the former Soviet Union, whose collapse was accelerated by its unsustainable nuclear ambitions."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

"I'm sure this will be all over the corporate media, right?"
That’s what one longtime Common Dreams reader said yesterday after the newsroom reported on new research showing how corporate price gouging surged to a nearly 70-year high in 2021. While major broadcasters, newspapers, and other outlets continue to carry water for their corporate advertisers when they report on issues like inflation, economic inequality, and the climate emergency, our independence empowers us to provide you stories and perspectives that powerful interests don’t want you to have. But this independence is only possible because of support from readers like you. You make the difference. If our support dries up, so will we. Our crucial Mid-Year Campaign is now underway and we are in emergency mode to make sure we raise the necessary funds so that every day we can bring you the stories that corporate, for-profit outlets ignore and neglect. Please, if you can, support Common Dreams today.

 

Scores Feared Dead and Wounded as Russian Missiles Hit Ukraine Shopping Center

"People just burned alive," said Ukraine's interior minister, while the head of the Poltava region stated that "it is too early to talk about the final number of the killed."

Brett Wilkins ·


Biodiversity Risks Could Persist for Decades After Global Temperature Peak

One study co-author said the findings "should act as a wake-up call that delaying emissions cuts will mean a temperature overshoot that comes at an astronomical cost to nature and humans that unproven negative emission technologies cannot simply reverse."

Jessica Corbett ·


Amnesty Report Demands Biden Take Action to End Death Penalty

"The world is waiting for the USA to do what almost 100 countries have achieved during this past half-century—total abolition of the death penalty," said the group.

Julia Conley ·


Pointing to 'Recently Obtained Evidence,' Jan. 6 Panel Calls Surprise Tuesday Hearing

The announcement came less than a week after the House panel delayed new hearings until next month, citing a "deluge" of fresh evidence.

Common Dreams staff ·


Looming US Supreme Court Climate Decision Could 'Doom' Hope for Livable Future

"The immediate issue is the limits of the EPA's ability to regulate greenhouse gases," said one scientist. "The broader issue is the ability of federal agencies to regulate anything at all."

Jessica Corbett ·

Common Dreams Logo