William Hartung

William Hartung

William D. Hartung is the director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy. He is the author of Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex (Nation Books, 2011). He is the co-editor of Lessons from Iraq: Avoiding the Next War (Paradigm Press, 2008).

 

Articles by this author

nuclear weapons Views
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
How to Wield Influence and Sell Weaponry in Washington
Until recently, few of us woke up worrying about the threat of nuclear war. Such dangers seemed like Cold War relics, associated with outmoded practices like building fallout shelters and “ duck and cover ” drills. But give Donald Trump credit. When it comes to nukes, he’s gotten our attention. He’...
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Tuesday, October 10, 2017
How the Military-Industrial Complex Preys on the Troops
Here’s a question for you: How do you spell boondoggle? The answer (in case you didn’t already know): P-e-n-t-a-g-o-n. Hawks on Capitol Hill and in the U.S. military routinely justify increases in the Defense Department's already munificent budget by arguing that yet more money is needed to “...
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Tuesday, July 25, 2017
The Hidden Costs of “National Security”
You wouldn’t know it, based on the endless cries for more money coming from the military , politicians , and the president , but these are the best of times for the Pentagon. Spending on the Department of Defense alone is already well in excess of half a trillion dollars a year and counting...
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Tuesday, June 20, 2017
Trump's Love Affair With the Saudis
At this point, it’s no great surprise when Donald Trump walks away from past statements in service to some impulse of the moment. Nowhere, however, has such a shift been more extreme or its potential consequences more dangerous than in his sudden love affair with the Saudi royal family. It could in...
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Tuesday, May 09, 2017
The American Way of War Is a Budget-Breaker
When Donald Trump wanted to “do something” about the use of chemical weapons on civilians in Syria, he had the U.S. Navy lob 59 cruise missiles at a Syrian airfield ( cost : $89 million). The strike was symbolic at best, as the Assad regime ran bombing missions from the same airfield the very next...
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Monday, March 06, 2017
Could War With Iran Be on Washington’s Agenda?
In the splurge of “news,” media-bashing, and Bannonism that’s been Donald Trump’s domestic version of a shock-and-awe campaign, it’s easy to forget just how much of what the new president and his administration have done so far is simply an intensification of trends long underway. Those who already...
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An exam room at the Planned Parenthood South Austin Health Center on June 27, 2016. Views
Friday, February 24, 2017
We Can Fight Trump’s Cuts to Essential Government Programs
E ven as the White House descends into further disarray, the Trump/Bannon administration has continued its campaign of political shock and awe, from its stalled Muslim ban to its gutting of environmental protections to its ongoing assault on Obamacare. Now the other shoe is about to drop—a...
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Thursday, February 02, 2017
Trump’s Vision of a Militarized America
At over $600 billion a year and counting, the Pentagon already receives significantly more than its fair share of federal funds. If President Donald Trump has his way, though, that will prove a sum for pikers and misers. He and his team are now promising that spending on defense and homeland...
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Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Donald Trump and The Pentagon: Reagonomics on Steroids?
As with so much of what Donald Trump has said in recent months, his positions on Pentagon spending are, to be polite, a bundle of contradictions. Early signs suggest, however, that those contradictions are likely to resolve themselves in favor of the usual suspects: the arms industry and its...
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Tuesday, October 25, 2016
The Doctrine of Armed Exceptionalism
Through good times and bad, regardless of what’s actually happening in the world, one thing is certain: in the long run, the Pentagon budget won’t go down. It’s not that that budget has never been reduced. At pivotal moments, like the end of World War II as well as war's end in Korea and Vietnam,...
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