Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson is an African-American civil rights activist and Baptist minister. He was a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1984 and 1988 and served as shadow senator for the District of Columbia from 1991 to 1997. He was the founder of both entities that merged to form Rainbow/PUSH.

Articles by this author

Cynthia Bailey pumps her fist outside the National Civil Rights Museum following the annual Martin Luther King Day march on January 16, 2017 in Memphis, Tennessee. Hundreds marched from the north end of downtown Memphis in honor of the civil rights leader to the site where King was assassinated in 1968, which now houses the National Civil Rights Museum (Photo by Mike Brown/Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, July 14, 2020
A New Generation of Protest Holds Great Promise for America
The inspiring rise of a new generation protesting against racial injustice is driving a new era of change in America, like the generation that emerged 60 years ago to build the civil rights movement of that time. July 16, 1960 is marked in my memory: that is the day I joined seven other friends to...
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People draw messages with chalk in a Seattle intersection. (Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Too Many African American Children Are Born in Shackles
“I can’t breathe,” pled George Floyd in Minneapolis and Eric Garner in New York City and Javier Ambler in Austin, Texas, before police killed them. Amid the protests against brutality, Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta, whom police found asleep in his car, was shot twice in the back and killed. In Austin...
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Fundamental policing reforms, writes Jesse Jackson, would begin with ending the “qualified immunity” of police, curbing the militarization of police forces, transferring funds and functions to social agencies, imposing residency requirements and finally making lynching a hate crime. (Photo: Natasha Moustache/Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, June 09, 2020
Police Reform Was Never Going to Be Easy—But Now's the Time
As the worldwide demonstrations continue two weeks after the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis policeman, the question is whether outrage will lead to real reforms? Fundamental reforms would begin with ending the "qualified immunity" of police, curbing the militarization of police forces,...
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Demonstrators march down I-94 in St. Paul, Minnesota, protest after the death in police custody of George Floyd on May 31. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, June 02, 2020
"I Can't Breathe": The Murder of George Floyd Was a Lynching in Broad Daylight
The murder of George Floyd was a lynching in broad daylight. Three police officers stood and watched as a fourth, Derek Chauvin, knelt on Floyd’s neck. They watched for 8 minutes and 46 seconds, with Floyd unresponsive for 2 minutes and 53 seconds of that, according to the criminal complaint...
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People wait in line as SF-Marin Food Bank hands out 1,600 food bags at a pop-up pantry at Bayview Opera House in San Francisco, California on Monday, April 20, 2020. Work furloughs and layoffs created by coronavirus shelter-in-place orders are driving thousands to seek food assistance. Views
Monday, May 25, 2020
Americans Have United Before to Defeat an External Enemy and We Can Again
We live in a time of bitter divisions. Today, even the wearing of masks has become a partisan question.
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Near the Capitol in Washington, people attend a rally in 2019 to mark the 65th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education ruling that ended public school segregation and fueled the civil rights movement. (Photo:Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, May 19, 2020
Remembering the Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education
Sunday, May 17, marked the 66th anniversary of the landmark 1954 Supreme Court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education . The Brown decision addressed consolidated issues from four different cases — in Kansas, South Carolina, Delaware and Virginia—involving racial segregation. The unanimous...
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People stand six feet apart before participating in a 2.23 mile walk for Ahmaud Arbery on May 8. Arbery was shot and killed while running in Brunswick, Georgia on Feb. 23. (Photo: Nicole Hester/Mlive.com) Views
Wednesday, May 13, 2020
The Murder of Ahmaud Arbery—And Our Continuing Terror
Today there is a national outcry about the murder of Ahmaud Arbery. The public condemnation has forced a belated response. Those accused of his murder finally have been arrested . His murder has become a global embarrassment for whites. For blacks, however, it is another humiliation, a continuing...
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 Voting is the fundamental basis of democracy. Particularly in times of crisis, it is vital that the people’s voice be heard. The president and the modern-day Republican Party are convinced that if everyone votes, they will not fare well. (Photo: CHUCK BURTON / ASSOCIATED PRESS) Views
Tuesday, May 05, 2020
We Must Protect the Right to Vote in the November Elections
The coronavirus does not discriminate, but people do. The coronavirus is not partisan, but politicians are. When we should be coming together to address a shared crisis, some are intent on driving us apart and exacting partisan advantage in the midst of the crisis. Across the country, Republicans...
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Prisoners increasingly are protesting their conditions, objecting to being sentenced to die in prison. (Photo: http://organizingcatholicsforjustice.org) Views
Tuesday, April 28, 2020
Let Prisoners Go During COVID-19 Pandemic
Across the United States and across the world, prisoners are among the most vulnerable to the coronavirus. Overcrowded facilities, shortages of food and medicine, and totally inadequate testing expose prisoners who are disproportionately poor and afflicted with prior conditions that render them...
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Prisons and jails are virtual petri dishes for the virus. Social distancing is impossible. Soap and water are often not available. (Photo: Robyn Beck / AFP - Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, April 21, 2020
Coronavirus Has Made Incarceration a Potential Death Sentence
This week, the New York Times featured the story of how the coronavirus savaged the Federal Correctional Complex in Oakdale, Louisiana. On March 28, Patrick Jones, 49, serving a 27-year sentence for possession of crack cocaine with the intent to distribute, became the first federal inmate to die of...
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