Post-Orlando Demagoguery Described as Trump's Most Horrifying to Date

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Post-Orlando Demagoguery Described as Trump's Most Horrifying to Date

'I think this is the most horrifying speech Trump has ever given, which is a high bar.'

In Monday's remarks, Trump reiterated his call for a ban on Muslims coming from any nation with ties to terrorism; falsely stated that the New York-born Orlando shooter was from Afghanistan; and "flat-out accused Muslim-American community of disloyalty." (Photo: AP)

"A man on TV is trying to make political capital out of the mass murder of innocent people."

"This is the scariest political speech I have ever seen in America."

"As a woman, and daughter of immigrants with an Arabic last name, this is probably the most frightening Trump speech I've heard."

Those were just a sampling of responses to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's fear-mongering and fallacy-ridden speech, delivered Monday afternoon in New Hampshire as a response to the mass shooting in Orlando

In his remarks, Trump reiterated his call for a ban on Muslims coming from any nation with ties to terrorism; falsely stated that the New York-born Orlando shooter was from Afghanistan; and "flat-out accused Muslim-American community of disloyalty," as Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson wrote on Twitter

"The immigration laws of the United States give the president powers to suspend entry into the country of any class of persons," Trump declared to about 100 people at St. Anselm College's Institute of Politics in New Hampshire. "I would use this power to protect the American people. When I'm elected, I will suspend immigration from areas of the world where there is a proven history of terrorism against the United States, Europe or our allies, until we fully understand how to end these threats."

He added: "We cannot continue to allow thousands upon thousands of people to pour into our country, many of whom have the same thought process as this savage killer."

He also accused Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton of supporting policies that will lead to "more radical Islamic immigration into this country."

"She wants to take away Americans' guns and then admit the very people who want to slaughter us," Trump said.

The outrage and dismay engendered by Trump's tirade were palpable online:

Earlier Monday, NBC News reported, Trump suggested in two separate interviews "that President Obama may have a secret agenda that prevents him from combating Islamic terrorists."

That "extraordinary insinuation," wrote Zaid Jilani at The Intercept, is "the logical extension of the particularly virulent anti-Muslim rhetoric Trump has employed throughout the campaign. Trump's rhetoric is not simply anti-Muslim; it has its roots in far-right conspiracy theories that hold that Islam itself is an enemy of the United States—and has tentacles at every level of our government."

Trump's initial reaction to the massacre that left dozens dead and as many wounded was to "rebuff" alleged "congrats for being right on radical Islamic terrorism."

At The Atlantic, journalist Ron Fournier offered a take-down of Trump's humblebrag:

You were not right on radical Islamic terrorism. But you are doing right by radical Islamic terrorism.

You are giving legitimacy to ISIS's nefarious interpretation of a peaceful religion.

You are helping ISIS recruit terrorists.

You are dividing Americans at a time when all Americans most need to be united.

So congratulations.

"Forty-nine innocent people dead and you took a victory lap in their blood," Fournier wrote. "Congratulations."

In the wake of the shooting, Muslim religious organizations have released a sweeping series of statements condemning the violence and offering condolences to the victims' families.

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