In First, Trump Ekes Ahead of Clinton in New National Poll

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In First, Trump Ekes Ahead of Clinton in New National Poll

Latest Rasmussen survey finds that in Clinton-Trump matchup, GOP candidate would claim 15 percent of Democratic voters

Among voters not affiliated with either major party, Trump leads Clinton 37 to 31 percent, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports phone survey. (Photo: DonkeyHotey/cc/flickr)

Among voters not affiliated with either major party, Trump leads Clinton 37 to 31 percent, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports phone survey. (Photo: DonkeyHotey/cc/flickr)

As the presidential nominating contests enter their final stretch, a troubling new trend has developed for Democratic voters as recent polling indicates that Hillary Clinton may be losing her lead over Republican frontrunner Donald Trump.

In a hypothetical matchup, the New York billionaire would defeat the former secretary of state 41 to 39 percent, according to the new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey, which was released on Monday.

According to the survey, which was conducted from April 27 to 28 among 1,000 likely voters:

Trump now has the support of 73% of Republicans, while 77% of Democrats back Clinton. But Trump picks up 15% of Democrats, while just eight percent (8%) of GOP voters prefer Clinton, given this matchup. Republicans are twice as likely to prefer another candidate. 

Among voters not affiliated with either major party, Trump leads 37% to 31%, but 23% like another candidate. Nine percent (9%) are undecided.

The results mark the first time since October that Trump has led Clinton in the Rasmussen poll while the latest RealClearPolitics average shows Clinton ahead of Trump by 7.3 percent.

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These findings come on the heels of George Washington University Battleground Poll last week, which found Clinton leading Trump by just 3 percentage points. Both surveys had a margin of error of roughly 3 points.

Underscoring both candidates' consistently low favorability ratings, Rasmussen also reported that nearly a quarter of voters said they would "opt out" of a Clinton-Trump race, either by voting for another candidate (16 percent) or staying home (6 percent).

Rasmussen states that Clinton's narrow lead among under-40 voters (38 to Trump's 32 percent) "suggests that younger voters will be a big target in the upcoming campaigning."

This "traditionally...reliable Democratic group," as the pollster put it, has heretofore resoundingly backed Sen. Bernie Sanders in this race and wooing youth voters is a challenge currently facing the Clinton campaign.

The Rasmussen poll comes one day ahead of the Indiana primary, which could prove to be a tight race for both parties. An NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist poll released Sunday found that Trump currently holds a seven-point lead over Clinton among Hoosier State voters.

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