Rebuke Swift After Albright Declares: 'Special Place in Hell' for Women Who Don't Vote Clinton

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Rebuke Swift After Albright Declares: 'Special Place in Hell' for Women Who Don't Vote Clinton

Madeleine Albright and Gloria Steinem scold female Bernie supporters, while Clinton touts approval from war-criminal Kissinger.

Madeleine Albright served as secretary of state under President Bill Clinton. (Photograph: Chip East/Reuters )

Madeleine Albright served as secretary of state under President Bill Clinton. (Photograph: Chip East/Reuters )

Maybe it wasn't such a great idea for Hillary Clinton to invite Madeleine Albright to campaign for her in New Hampshire.

During a campaign event in Concord on Saturday, the former Secretary of State declared: "Young women have to support Hillary Clinton. The story is not over!"

"They’re going to want to push us back," she continued. "It’s not done and you have to help. Hillary Clinton will always be there for you. And just remember, there’s a special place in hell for women who don’t help each other."

And while it was not the first time Albright muttered that phrase, the backlash was swift and severe.

Pointing to Albright's notorious defense of the 1990 sanctions on Iraq, during which she said that the death of 500,000 Iraqi children was "worth it," observers speculated about someone else who may end up in that "special place."

The comments came a day after feminist icon Gloria Steinem said in an interview that young women were supporting Bernie Sanders because "that's where the boys are."

Donna Smith, executive director of Progressive Democrats of America and Common Dreams contributor, said on Sunday that Steinem's argument was "really odd...coming from a woman who has lived her life lifting women up and demanding that as equals to men we have the right to our own minds and bodies. Presumably that includes the right to our own political decisions as well."

"When we get through this presidential primary season on the Democratic side, I want us to present the best possible platform for all people," Smith continued. "Right now as I observe this presidential race, Bernie's positions on critical issues for working class women like me offer the best hope that lives may be transformed in ways that give all of us the best chance to achieve our potential."

Kevin Gosztola, managing editor of Shadowproof, argued Sunday that comments such as those made by Albright and Steinem have "degraded debate about feminist issues and boorishly transformed characteristics of personalities into matters of equal rights."

Throughout the campaign, Clinton has taken heat for her association with corporate giants, including Goldman Sachs and Walmart. But, in recent days, the individuals vouching for her candidacy have also raised more than a few eyebrows.

During Thursday's Democratic debate, Clinton said that she "was very flattered when Henry Kissinger said I ran the State Department better—better than anybody had run it in a long time." This she said of a person who has been accused of war crimes.

Apparently, as the New Republic's Michael Tracey put it: "The significance of Kissinger’s well-documented responsibility for atrocities in Cambodia, East Timor, Chile, and elsewhere is subordinate to his reputation as a statesman unbound by partisan loyalties."

Or as columnist Dave Zirin wrote:

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