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Where do your Representatives Stand on the Influence of Big Money in Politics?

This is the first step to restore a government that works for people, not money

"Every voter has the right to know whether or not their next member of Congress will represent ‘We the People’ or big money and special interests."(Photo: Susan Melkisethian/Flickr/cc)

"Every voter has the right to know whether or not their next member of Congress will represent ‘We the People’ or big money and special interests."(Photo: Susan Melkisethian/Flickr/cc)

An essential feature of any representative democracy, like the United States, is that voters can elect candidates who will represent their constituents once elected. In order for this arrangement to work, voters need to know where candidates stand on important issues, and vice versa.

That’s why American Promise is asking every candidate for federal office where they stand on one of the most important issues of this upcoming election: will you work to create fair elections so every American has an equal voice in our democracy?

So far over 200 candidates, including Democrats, Republicans, and independents, have pledged to use their office to end the influence of big money and special interests in campaigns and elections.  Launched earlier this year, the American Promise 28th Amendment Candidate Pledge asks candidates to use their office to advance an amendment to the U.S. Constitution to “secure fair, free elections by limiting the undue influence of money in politics; protect the rights of all Americans to equal participation and representation rather than the over-representation of donors and special interests; and protect the unalienable liberty of people rather than new privileges for the largest corporations, unions, and special interests.”

19 states and over 800 cities and towns have passed resolutions with support from Republicans, Democrats, and independents formally calling on Congress to amend the U.S. Constitution to limit the influence of money in politics.

Every voter has the right to know whether or not their next member of Congress will represent ‘We the People’ or big money and special interests. This is the first step to restore a government that works for people, not money.  

Americans overwhelmingly support curbing the undue influence of money in our elections. 19 states and over 800 cities and towns have passed resolutions with support from Republicans, Democrats, and independents formally calling on Congress to amend the U.S. Constitution to limit the influence of money in politics.  In Montana, Colorado, California, and Washington voters have approved similar resolutions through ballot initiatives, and Massachusetts voters will have the opportunity to pass a resolution on the November ballot.  Multiple versions of amendments have been proposed in Congress, with 43 co-sponsors in the U.S. Senate and 147 co-sponsors in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Politicians and candidates are waking up to the fact that Americans overwhelmingly want them to champion an amendment to end legalized corruption and create a government accountable to the people, not corporations and special interests.  Continuing through Election Day in November, we will be mobilizing hundreds of thousands of citizens to ask every candidate to sign the pledge.

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Johannes Epke

Johannes Epke

Johannes Epke is Counsel at American Promise. The goal of American Promise is to win the 28th Amendment to The Constitution to restore American democracy in which we citizens - not money, not corporations, not special interests - govern ourselves.

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