Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

Today is the LAST DAY of this Mid-Year Campaign. This is our hour of need.
If you value independent journalism, please support Common Dreams.

TODAY is the last day to meet our goal -- Join the small group of generous readers who donate, keeping Common Dreams free for millions of people each year.

The Trump administration said Friday it would move to end temporary protections for Hondurans, many of whom have been in the U.S. for nearly 20 years. (Photo: Peg Hunter/Flickr/cc)

Immigrant Rights Advocates Denounce Trump DHS for 'Shameful and Cruel' End to Protection for Hondurans

In "another unconscionable attack on immigrants," the Trump administration will force 57,000 Hondurans out of the country—bringing the total number of people who have lost TPS under Trump to 425,000

Julia Conley

More than 50,000 people will be "condemned to misery," according to one immigrant rights advocate, following the Trump administration's decision to end Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Hondurans who arrived in the U.S. after fleeing their hurricane-ravaged country in 1999.

"The Trump administration is turning its back on thousands of families who arrived from Honduras seeking safety," said Marselha Gonçalves Margerin, an advocacy director at Amnesty International USA. "Many families, including children who are U.S. citizens, could risk threats, kidnapping, gender-based violence, or even death if sent to Honduras. It is heartless to offer safety to people seeking protection only to take it away and force them to return to a place where the justice system can’t deliver justice.”

While Honduras is no longer recovering from Hurricane Mitch, which forced 57,000 people to flee to the U.S., the country is one of the world's most violent, with gang warfare an ongoing occurrence and massive deadly political unrest following the last presidential election.

Following a U.S.-backed military coup in 2009, in which the party of current president Juan Orlando Hernandez forcibly took power, thousands of Hondurans have fled the country, including many of the asylum-seekers who traveled through Mexico to the U.S. border in recent weeks, arriving this week.

"When individuals often feel they don't have a choice but to flee their beautiful countries, it's because they have lost all hope," Martin Pineda, an organizer with Carecen, said in a statement. "It is no coincidence that 80 percent of the Central American Refugee Caravan consists of Hondurans, particularly mothers, children, and members of the LGBTQI communities who are seeking their legal right of asylum."

Now Hondurans who have lived, worked, and raised families in the U.S. for nearly two decades will have less than two years to leave the country or face deportation.

Hondurans are the second largest group, after Salvadoreans, who have had their TPS protection revoked by the U.S. About 200,000 people who had come to the country from El Salvador were told earlier this year that they had a matter of months to leave the country.

As CNN reports, the decision to revoke TPS for Hondurans "brings the total number of immigrants for whom the administration has decided to end temporary protected status in the last year to more than 425,000, many who have lived in the US legally for decades, according to numbers from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services."

"There is little doubt that the White House has been driving these TPS decisions based on ideology, not based upon what is best for our foreign policy interests and for the region," Kevin Appleby of the Center for Migration Studies told the Washington Post.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

TODAY is the last day of our crucial Mid-Year Campaign and we might not make it without your help.
Who funds our independent journalism? Readers like you who believe in our mission: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. No corporate advertisers. No billionaire founder. Our non-partisan, nonprofit media model has only one source of revenue: The people who read and value this work and our mission. That's it.
And the model is simple: If everyone just gives whatever amount they can afford and think is reasonable—$3, $9, $29, or more—we can continue. If not enough do, we go dark.

All the small gifts add up to something otherwise impossible. Please join us today. Donate to Common Dreams. This is crunch time. We need you now.

Texas Supreme Court Allows Century-Old Abortion Ban to Take Effect

"Extremist politicians are on a crusade to force Texans into pregnancy and childbirth against their will, no matter how devastating the consequences."

Jake Johnson ·


'What's There to Even Discuss?' Omar Says Free, Universal School Meals Should Be Permanent

"We have an opportunity to prove that a government of the people, by the people, and for the people can still deliver big things. And we can feed tens of millions of hungry kids while we do it."

Jake Johnson ·


'Stark Betrayal': Biden Administration Floats New Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling

"This is the third time since November the Biden administration has announced new oil and gas leasing plans on the Friday before a holiday," said one climate advocate. "They're ashamed, and they should be."

Jake Johnson ·


As US Rolls Back Reproductive Rights, Sierra Leone Moves to Decriminalize Abortion

"I'm hopeful today's announcement gives activists in the U.S., and especially Black women given the shared history, a restored faith that change is possible and progress can be made."

Brett Wilkins ·


'Indefensible': Outrage as New Reporting Shines Light on Biden Deal With McConnell

The president has reportedly agreed to nominate an anti-abortion Republican to a lifetime judgeship. In exchange, McConnell has vowed to stop blocking two Biden picks for term-limited U.S. attorney posts.

Jake Johnson ·

Common Dreams Logo