Jerry Lanson

Jerry Lanson is an associate professor of journalism at Emerson College in Boston.  His third book, "Writing for Others, Writing for Ourselves: Telling Stories in an Age of Blogging" will be published by Rowman & Littlefield this fall. His blog can be found at jerrylanson.wordpress.com

Articles by this author

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Sunday, November 10, 2013
Why Does Congress Think It's OK for Working Americans to Go Hungry?
The Dow closed the week at a record high. And all those billionaires? They're barely even an exclusive club anymore, what with 442 in the U.S.
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Saturday, October 30, 2010
News Media Share Blame for Voters' Ignorance
A couple of interesting items on politicalwire.com today show how hopelessly ill-informed the electorate is.
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Sunday, September 26, 2010
Pick Your Poison: America's Election-Year Politics
I was at a party at my brother's house last weekend when I got into a conversation with a woman who I knew to be a moderate Republican. "A lot of my friends in the Midwest are firmly convinced Obama is a socialist," she told me earnestly. "Really," I replied. "I've always found him rather moderate. Can you give me an example of why they feel that way?" "Well, no," she replied. "But my friends have lots and lots of evidence."
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Friday, September 10, 2010
When Sensationalism Rules the News
A marginal Florida minister with a flock smaller than 50 rivets the nation's attention with a threat to burn 50 Korans. Attention to his bigotry builds slowly, from scant attention to a 2009 sign outside his Gainesville church that reads "Islam is of the devil," to more than 150 news media interviews in July and August of this year, according to The New York Times, that give him a platform for his latest brand of hate.
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Friday, September 03, 2010
Journalism by Poll Simply Reflects Conventional Wisdom
I teach my students that the best reporters zig when everyone else zags. They leave the panting pack behind to look to the corners of news, to listen to voices that are ignored, such as the old, the poor, the working stiff; to seek out experts with different opinions and fresh rationales for them; and to visit the countless places in America other than Capitol Hill or the brick and stone halls of state and local power.
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