Greg Mitchell

Greg Mitchell writes the Media Fix blog for The Nation. Mitchell is the former editor of Editor & Publisher magazine and author of nine nonfiction books. His current book, published in February 2011, is The Age of Wikileaks: From Collateral Murder to Cablegate. Previous books are Why Obama Won, published in January 2009, and So Wrong for So Long: How the Press, the Pundits -- and the President -- Failed on Iraq, which came out in March 2008. His new book and e-book is Atomic Cover-Up: Two U.S. Soldiers, Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and The Greatest Movie Never Made.  His Twitter feed is @MediaFixBlog.

Articles by this author

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Thursday, August 30, 2012
Most in Media Ignore Ryan's Lies--and Forgive Condi's
I'm sure it's only coincidence, but it was still heartening last night to see so many in certain outposts of the media follow my urgent advice here yesterday ( my piece ) to not "live and let lie"--to state plainly that untruths uttered by speakers and candidates are outright lies and not beat around the bush. This mainly happened online. Still, on cable TV last night and in the mainstream press we witnessed, in the main, the traditional kind of timidity that insists on calling lies merely "exaggerations," "d
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Monday, September 19, 2011
Who'll Be 'The Last Soldier To Die for a Mistake' in Afghanistan?
In the midst of weeks of debate over the economy, jobs, and the deficit, media and public attention have once again drifted from Afghanistan, even as the killing, and the stalemate, go on. I follow that war more closely than most, and even I cannot recall the president's latest promise or when exactly he is supposed to announce the next step. Polls show the public is so obsessed with the economy that few call for getting out of our wars as a top priority, even though our military spending is a prime cause for our budget problems.
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Tuesday, August 09, 2011
The Crime of Nagasaki—The 'Forgotten' A-Bomb City
Few journalists bother to visit Nagasaki, even though it is one of only two cities in the world to “meet the atomic bomb,” as some of the survivors of that experience, sixty-six years ago today, put it. It remains the Second City, and “Fat Man” the forgotten bomb. No one in America ever wrote a bestselling book called Nagasaki , or made a film titled Nagasaki, Mon Amour . “We are an asterisk,” Shinji Takahashi, a sociologist in Nagasaki, once told me, with a bitter smile. “The inferior A-bomb city.”
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Wednesday, May 25, 2011
'Frontline' WikiLeaks Program: No Meat, Just a Goldfish
The mountain labored, and in the end, it gave birth to a mouse. Or rather, a goldfish. One of the only bits of new information in the much-ballyhooded PBS Frontline program on WikiLeaks, Assange and Bradley Manning which aired tonight was: The man who fingered Manning, Adrian Lamo, secluded in California, has a large goldfish in his apartment.
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Friday, April 29, 2011
At 8th Anniversary of Bush's Landing on the Deck: 'Mission' Still Not 'Accomplished'
Sunday marks the 8th anniversary of Mission Accomplished Day, or as it might better be known, Mission Accomplished (NOT) Day. Coming on a weekend, there will be even fewer mentions of this in the national media than last year, and Keith Olbermann will not be on the air to update the usual close to his telecast when he marks exactly how many days since Bush declared victory (you do the math).
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Friday, March 04, 2011
Bradley Manning and the Tomb of the Well-Known Soldier
Ten months after he was arrested for allegedly leaking classified material, including diplomatic cables, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was very much in the news this week -- with the military bringing 22 new charges against him, including "aiding the enemy" (unspecified) to being stripped naked for seven hours at the prison the past two nights. His supporters and attorney David Coombs continued to charge that the conditions of his confinement were overly harsh and punitive, while the Pentagon continues to deny that.
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Friday, January 14, 2011
Why WikiLeaks Matters
Nearly fifty days have passed since the WikiLeaks document release in late November, this one centering on US diplomatic cables and quickly dubbed "Cablegate." At this writing, not even 3,000 cables from the cache, which reportedly holds more than 251,000 documents, have been published by WikiLeaks or, in most cases, by its newspaper partners, and it's impossible to know whether everything of prime importance has already emerged in the cherry-picking.
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Monday, August 09, 2010
Press Censorship: How the Truth Was Hidden About Nagasaki 65 Years Ago
Nagasaki, which lost over 70,000 civilians (and a few military personnel) to a new weapon 65 years ago today, has always been The Forgotten A-Bomb City. No one ever wrote a bestselling book called Nagasaki, or made a film titled Nagasaki, Mon Amour. Yet in some ways, Nagasaki is the modern A-bomb city. For one thing, when the plutonium bomb exploded above Nagasaki it made the uranium-type bomb dropped on Hiroshima obsolete. In fact, if it had not exploded off-target the death toll in the city would have easily topped the Hiroshima total.
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Friday, July 30, 2010
What's Sadly Missing in Time's Afghan Cover
The Time magazine cover story this week arrives with a graphic cover image next to the title, "What Happens If We Leave Afghanistan." It shows an Afghan teen named Aisha whose nose and ears had been sliced off by the Taliban. Inside, editor Rick Stengel explains that he consulted psychologists about what harm could be done to children who might see this disturbing image. But he also defends the aim of the story itself in the following paragraph:
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Wednesday, March 31, 2010
7th Anniversary of Iraq War Passes, But Myths Endure
Seven years ago The New York Times ran a prominent photo from a meeting of past Pentagon chiefs who had gathered at the White House for a discussion about 10 days into our invasion of Iraq. Victory still seemed assured but it was also becoming clear that we were not being greeted as liberators in most areas. The picture showed current Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld shaking hands with a past master, Robert McNamara. That day I supplied what I imagined McNamara whispering: "What part of 'Vietnam' don't you understand?"
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