Grace Lee Boggs

Grace Lee Boggs (1925-2015) was an activist and community organizer for more than 60 years and is the author of the autobiography Living for Change and, with Scott Kurashige, The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century.

Articles by this author

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Monday, October 05, 2015
Living for Change: If Not Now, When?
[Editor's note: The following essay by Grace Lee Boggs (1915-2015) was first published by Common Dreams on August 23, 2010. With the passing of Boggs announced on Monday, we share in the mourning of those who knew her best and the untold number of people who were influenced and inspired by her life...
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Sunday, August 18, 2013
In Detroit, We Have Just Begun to Fight
I ‘ve been a Detroiter for 60 years and this is the first time in my experience that so many different organizations with different ideologies and personalities have recognized that the time has come when we must join together to resist and defeat the growing counter-revolution.
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Friday, June 24, 2011
Planting Seeds of Hope: How Sustainable Activism Transformed Detroit
In 1988, we in Detroit were at one of the great turning points in history. Detroit’s deindustrialization, devastation, and depopulation had turned the city into a wasteland, but it had also created the space and place where there was not only the necessity but also the possibility of creating a city based not on expanding production but on new values of sustainability and community.
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Sunday, March 20, 2011
Wisconsin: Time to Grow our Souls
The world’s eyes are on the escalating struggle to defend the collective bargaining rights of Wisconsin public workers. Some people have even called the growing mobilization a transformational movement, But transformational organizing takes more than growing numbers. Revisiting the 1955–56 Montgomery Bus Boycott can help us understand what it takes.
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Tuesday, December 28, 2010
Looking Back at 2010
It was the worst of times In 2010 joblessness and foreclosures reached record heights. In cities like Detroit and Milwaukee, 50% of African American males, ages 18-60, were unemployed. In Afghanistan Obama's troop surge and U.S. air strikes were killing so many civilians that the Afghan people were viewing the U.S. military and NATO as foreign occupiers.
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Monday, December 20, 2010
Thinking Dialectically About Solidarity
The recent visit of two Afro-Columbians to the Boggs Center started me thinking dialectically about the paradigm shift in the concept and practice of Solidarity made necessary and possible by corporate globalization.
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Tuesday, December 07, 2010
Reflections on Thanksgiving
I recall many Thanksgivings, some more enjoyable than others but each worth reflecting on. When I was a child, relatives who worked in my father's restaurant and lived bachelor lives because their wives and families had been left behind in China, would show up at our house on Thanksgiving, bearing gifts of fruits and nuts. I found it hard to relate to them because they only spoke Chinese, which we kids no longer did. But even as a child I sensed that, for these sojourners in a strange land, Thanksgiving meant connecting with family.
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Sunday, November 14, 2010
Why Was Obama Shellacked?
Two years ago, in the fall of 2008, over a million citizen activists of all ethnic groups, mostly young people, often accompanied by middle-aged or elderly independents, went door to door, urging voters to go to the polls and elect Barach Obama to the White House. We/they did this because we believed and hoped that this charismatic black man could bring about the transformational changes we urgently need at this time on the clock of the world when the U.S. pursuit of unlimited economic growth has reached its social and ecological limits.
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Monday, November 08, 2010
The Great 'Rethinkers': New Orleans Teens Rethink Schools and Shrimping
I’ve just read an inspiring and instructive story about how a few dozen middle schoolers in post-Katrina New Orleans began rethinking their schools and found themselves helping to reconstruct their local economy.
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Sunday, September 19, 2010
Economics as if People Mattered
As I‘ve been following President Obama's desperate efforts to devise a popular Jobs programs in order to avoid his party's defeat in the November election, I've also been re-reading (and urging others to read) "Buddhist Economics" by E.F. Schumacher. I first read this amazingly timely article in 1969 when my friend, Henry Geiger, featured it in Manas, his little 8-page weekly with only 2500 subscribers. Robert M. Hutchins, the internationally renowned University of Chicago President, called them "the 2,500 most interesting people in the world."
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