Danny Sjursen

Danny Sjursen

Danny Sjursen is a retired US Army officer, senior fellow at the Center for International Policy (CIP), and director of the soon-to-launch Eisenhower Media Network (EMN). His work has appeared in the NY Times, LA Times, The Nation, Common Dreams, Huff Post, The Hill, Salon, Mother Jones, ScheerPost, and TomDispatch, among other publications. He served combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and later taught history at West Point. He is the author of a memoir and critical analysis of the Iraq War, "Ghostriders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge" (2015) and "Patriotic Dissent: America in the Age of Endless War" (2020).  Along with fellow vet Chris "Henri" Henriksen, he co-hosts the podcast “Fortress on a Hill.” Follow him on Twitter @SkepticalVet and on his website.

Articles by this author

President Joe Biden participates in a CNN town hall at the Pabst Theater in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on February 16, 2021. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images) Views
Wednesday, March 03, 2021
Biden Is Following a Failed Blueprint for Forever War
Last week, the U.S. military bombed a site near al-Hurri, along the Iraqi border inside Syria, where Iranian-backed Iraqi militias were allegedly stationed. Although the U.S. launched its missiles across an international border (and without the approval of Congress), White House Press Secretary Jen...
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Top row, from left: memorial to Robert Gould Shaw in Boston; Alvin York; a bust of Lt. Henry Flipper; then-Capt. Josephine Nesbit; bottom row, from left: Daniel Inouye in 1959; George McGovern in 1972; Chief Warrant Officer Hugh Thompson in 1969; a bust of Geronimo in the museum at Ft. Sill in Oklahoma. Views
Sunday, June 14, 2020
Rename the Army Posts—These 10 Soldiers Deserve the Honor
The United States must be the only nation in the world that names military posts after traitors. The police killing of George Floyd has brought renewed attention to this absurd practice, in which U.S. Army and Army National Guard installations across the South bear the names of secessionist...
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Eugene Debs delivering a speech in Chicago in 1912. "I can see the dawn of the better day for humanity," the famous socialist leader once said. "The people are awakening. In due time they will and must come to their own." (Photo: Wikipedia) Views
Friday, May 01, 2020
Romance Is the New Realism: Eugene Debs and the Age of Corona
I was first exposed to Eugene Victor Debs through Kurt Vonnegut novels . That sci-fi social critic was a lifelong fan and referenced Debs in several of his books. Since then, mine has been a whirlwind historical love affair. The passion and eloquence of this former worker turned labor leader, and...
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Prime Minister Netanyahu has recently, and probably accurately from his perspective, called Donald Trump “the best friend that Israel has ever had in the White House.”(Photo: Wikimedia Commons) Views
Thursday, February 13, 2020
America and Israel Against the World
My Spotify workout playlist is a time warp. Growing up in a blue-collar neighborhood of New York City in the 1990s and early 2000s, listening to popular East Coast hip-hop was practically required. So on a recent morning in which I had planned to write a column about Israel/Palestine, I jammed out...
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Iranian pride, nationalism and basic sense of sovereignty, deeply wounded by Soleimani’s assassination, may demand an actual hot war with the U.S. (Photo: Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images) Views
Monday, January 06, 2020
Trump’s Illegal, Impeachable Act of War
Violence begets violence; revenge engenders cycles of vengeance. This is exactly why war, or acts of war, must not be taken lightly. It also explains why America’s recent adventurism in the Middle East has only increased Islamic terrorism, killed hundreds of thousands worldwide, and ultimately left...
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 I can’t help but surmise that the original sin of America’s Afghan war, particularly after the initial 2001 invasion, was the reflexive assumption that within this landlocked Central Asian country, an imposed, Western-style representative democracy could take root. (Photo: Scott Nelson/Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, December 10, 2019
I Knew the War in Afghanistan Was a Lie
Nightmares still haunt me. Sometimes it’s the standard stuff associated with classic post-traumatic stress disorder: flashbacks of horrible attacks and images of my mutilated troopers. More often, though, peculiar as it may sound, I dream that my sociopathic, career-obsessed colonel calls to give...
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Tuesday, December 03, 2019
Humanity Is Riding Delusion to Extinction
Horses sporting gas masks. That, of all things, has been on my mind lately. Bear with me, now. Gaze at the ever-so-cockamamie photo. A horse, wearing a gas mask. Nothing so illustrates the rank absurdity and irrationality of the human condition. It was during World War I—which killed an unheard-of...
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Friday, November 22, 2019
Trump's War Crime Pardons Will Forever Be a Stain on the United States
Donald Trump loves him some bluster, worships machismo, and always has. Spectacle over substance has long been the name of his game. Decades before his successful presidential run, back when he was still a cartoon billionaire playboy, Trump took out a full-page newspaper advertisement that argued...
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Former U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis visits FOX News Channel’s "The Story with Martha MacCallum" on September 03, 2019 in New York City. (Photo: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images) Views
Friday, October 25, 2019
Angered Over the Whiff of US Troop Withdrawals, Now the Generals Speak Up?
Now they’ve decided to speak out! For years, I’ve published searing critiques of America’s senior generals and admirals for their failure to speak out publicly against U.S. foreign policy and warmongering. Specifically, I’ve argued that it’s their duty to loudly dissent, and if necessary resign, in...
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California Rep. Duncan Hunter. (Photo: Denis Poroy / AP) Views
Friday, June 07, 2019
Whitewashing War Crimes Has Become the American Way
Just after dawn on March 16, 1968, a company of U.S. Army infantrymen, led by Capt. Ernest Medina and spearheaded by Lt. William Calley, entered the small hamlet of My Lai in Quang Ngai province, South Vietnam. The villagers, mostly women and children, had no idea what was coming that day. If they...
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