Conn Hallinan

Conn Hallinan

Conn Hallinan has been a journalist for over 50 years and is currently a columnist for Foreign Policy In Focus, a part of the Institute for Policy Study. He formerly ran the journalism program at the University of California at Santa Cruz and served as a provost of one of UCSC’s colleges. He also served on the KPFA Listener’s Board and chaired the Board for two years.

 

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, November 04, 2015
Turkey’s President Gets His Majority — at a Terrible Price
If there’s a lesson to be drawn from the November 1 Turkish elections, it’s that fear works, and there are few people better at engendering it than Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Only five months after his Justice and Development Party (AKP) lost its majority in the Turkish parliament, a...
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Sunday, August 30, 2015
How Austerity Economics Is Fraying Europe’s Social Contract
On one level, the recent financial agreement between the European Union and Greece makes no sense: Not a single major economist thinks the $96 billion loan will allow Athens to repay its debts, or get the economy moving anywhere but downwards. It’s what former Greek Finance Minister Yanis...
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Wednesday, August 05, 2015
Behind Washington’s ‘Crackpot’ Deal with Turkey to Fight ISIS
The recent agreement between Turkey and the United States to cooperate against the Islamic State in Syria brings to mind the sociologist C. Wright Mills’ description of those who make American foreign policy as “crackpot realists”: realists about advancing their careers, crackpots about the...
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Monday, June 22, 2015
‘The American Century’ Has Plunged the World Into Crisis. What Happens Now?
There’s something fundamentally wrong with U.S. foreign policy. Despite glimmers of hope — a tentative nuclear agreement with Iran, for one, and a long-overdue thaw with Cuba — we’re locked into seemingly irresolvable conflicts in most regions of the world. They range from tensions with nuclear-...
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Tuesday, June 09, 2015
The Dark Saudi-Israeli Plot to Tip the Scales in Syria
A quiet meeting this past March in Saudi Arabia, and a recent anonymous leak from the Israeli military, set the stage for what may be a new and wider war in the Middle East. Gathering in the Saudi Arabian capital of Riyadh were Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, newly crowned Saudi King Salman...
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Tuesday, May 12, 2015
Yemen’s War Is Redrawing the Middle East’s Fault Lines
Yemen is the poorest country in the Arab world, bereft of resources, fractured by tribal divisions and religious sectarianism, and plagued by civil war. And yet this small country tucked into the bottom of the Arabian Peninsula is shattering old alliances and spurring new and surprising ones. As...
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Friday, April 10, 2015
Yemen and the Congress of Reaction
Saudi Arabia’s recent intrusion into Yemen is ostensibly part of a bitter proxy war with Iran. But the coalition that Riyadh has assembled to intervene in Yemen’s civil war has more in common with 19 th -century Europe than the 21 st -century Middle East. The 22-member Arab League came together at...
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Friday, November 14, 2014
The Big Chill: Tensions in the Arctic
One hundred and sixty-eight years ago this past July, two British warships— HMS Erebus and HMS Terror —sailed north into Baffin Bay, bound on a mission to navigate the fabled Northwest Passage between the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. It would be the last that the 19 th -century world would see...
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A 19th-century cartoon skewers British imperialism in the Middle East. The current tumult in the region today is a direct result of the arbitrary boundaries and divide-and-rule tactics employed by the imperial British and French. (Image: Middle East Cartoon History) Views
Wednesday, July 02, 2014
ISIS: The Spoils of the “Great Loot” in the Middle East
“So far as Syria is concerned, it is France and not Turkey that is the enemy.” – T. E. Lawrence, February 1915 . It was a curious comment by the oddball but unarguably brilliant British agent and scholar, Thomas Edward Lawrence. The time was World War I, and England and France were locked in a...
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Tuesday, December 03, 2013
Pandora and the Drones
In November 2001, when the CIA assassinated al-Qaeda commander Mohammed Atef with a killer drone in Kandahar, Afghanistan, the U.S. held a virtual monopoly on the technology of lethal robots.
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