Cindy Cohn

Cindy Cohn is legal director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), as well as its general counsel, coordinating over 40 national class action lawsuits against the telecommunications carriers and the government seeking to stop warrantless NSA surveillance

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, May 21, 2013
5 Overlooked Lessons From the AP Subpoena Controversy and Other Leak Investigations
The journalism world has been rightly outraged by the Justice Department dragging the Associated Press (and now a Fox News reporter ) into one of its sprawling leak investigations.
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Tuesday, May 14, 2013
Justice Department Subpoena of AP Journalists Shows Need to Protect Calling Records
On Monday, the Associated Press reported that the Department of Justice has collected the telephone calling records of many of its reporters and editors. By obtaining these records, the DOJ has struck a terrible blow against the freedom of the press and the ability of reporters to investigate and report the news.
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Monday, May 06, 2013
After the Tragedy in Boston, More Government Surveillance is Not the Answer
Since the tragedy in Boston two weeks ago, there has been much talk in the media and political circles about technology that helped capture the suspects, the role of surveillance, and the critical issue of how privacy should be handled in the digital age.
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Wednesday, November 28, 2012
ECPA and the Mire of DC Politics: We Shouldn’t Have to Trade Video Privacy to Get Common-Sense Protections of our Email
On Thursday, the Senate Judiciary Committee is marking up a bill that would amend the Video Privacy Protection Act (VPPA) in ways we think are unnecessary and potentially bad for users, giving companies new rights to share your video rental history after they get your “consent” just once. It undermines one of the strongest consumer privacy protections we now enjoy.
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Tuesday, July 10, 2012
The NSA's Warrantless Wiretapping Is a Crime, Not a State Secret
This week, cellphone carriers publicly reported that US law enforcement made an astounding 1.3m demands for customer text messages, caller locations, and other information last year.
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