Turns Out, Most Americans Do Not Support Trump's Bigoted Policies

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Turns Out, Most Americans Do Not Support Trump's Bigoted Policies

Unfavorability for the presumptive GOP nominee climbs while only 25 percent of voters approve of response to the attack in Orlando

When broken down along party lines, it is apparent that the discriminatory Muslim ban continues to resonate with Republican voters. (Photo: Gage Skidmore/cc/flickr)

When broken down along party lines, it is apparent that the discriminatory Muslim ban continues to resonate with Republican voters. (Photo: Gage Skidmore/cc/flickr)

Donald Trump's response to the attack in Orlando—described as "horrifying," "ignorant," and "demagogic"—is not resonating with the majority of Americans.

A new CBS News survey released Wednesday found that only 25 percent of Americans approve of the presumptive Republican nominee's post-shooting speech, while 51 percent stated that they disapprove.

At the same time, the New York billionaire's overall unfavorability ratings continue to climb. A full 70 percent of Americans perceive Trump unfavorably, according to a new ABC News/ Washington Post poll (pdf)—ten points higher than last month and just one point shy of his record negativity rating. The presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton also reached a new high for unfavorability, at 55 percent.

"Trump’s result reverses a boost he received after securing the Republican presidential nomination, from 37-60 percent favorable-unfavorable in mid-May to 29-70 percent now," the poll states, noting that the bump comes "after a week in which he took sharp criticism for suggesting that he was being treated unfairly by a federal judge because of the judge’s Mexican heritage."

Following this weekend's mass shooting at a Florida gay club, Trump reiterated his call for a ban on Muslims traveling from any nation with ties to terrorism. According to the CBS poll, the majority of Americans do not support that proposal.

Sixty-two percent of voters think the U.S. should not temporarily ban Muslims from entering the country, while 31 percent think the U.S. should do so.

However, when broken down along party lines, it is apparent that the hypothetical discriminatory ban continues to resonate with Republican voters. While 79 percent of Democrats and 62 percent of independents oppose the ban, 56 percent of Republicans favor the proposal. Those findings mirror the results of a December poll (pdf).

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