Christine Ahn

Christine Ahn is a founding board member of the Korea Policy Institute and the National Campaign to End the Korean War.  Ahn is also the Executive Director of Women Cross DMZ, a movement of women globally walking to end the Korean War, reunite families, and ensure women’s leadership in the peacebuilding process.

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, August 24, 2016 - 10:45am
Let the Peace Games Begin
The contrast between the two games couldn’t be starker. On the one hand, the world’s most technologically advanced militaries and weapons systems are deployed to practice combat. On the other, despite tremendous nationalist pressure to beat the other, athletes from North Korea and South Korea...
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Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 10:15am
A Year Ago, I Crossed the DMZ in Korea. Here’s Why.
One year ago, I led a group of 30 women from 15 countries on a journey across the De-Militarized Zone (DMZ) from North to South Korea. On May 24, International Women’s Day for Peace and Disarmament, we crossed the world’s most militarized border calling for the reunification of Korean families...
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Thursday, January 7, 2016 - 11:15am
To End North Korea’s Nuclear Program, End the Korean War
North Korea announced recently that it had successfully detonated its first hydrogen bomb. “This test is a measure for self-defense,” state media announced, “to firmly protect the sovereignty of the country and the vital right of the nation from the ever-growing nuclear threat and blackmail by the...
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Saturday, December 20, 2014 - 8:45am
Okinawa: The Small Island Trying to Block the U.S. Military’s 'Pivot to Asia'
On December 10 — International Human Rights Day — Takeshi Onaga began his term as the new governor of Okinawa. Last month, the citizens of Okinawa delivered a landslide victory to Onaga, who ran on a platform opposing the construction of a new U.S. Marine Corps base in northern Okinawa. Using the...
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Former comfort women and their supporters dedicate a memorial to victims of the Japanese military’s sex trafficking of women and girls during the Second World War. (Photo: Melissa Wall / Flickr) Views
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 8:45am
Seeking Justice—Or at Least the Truth—for 'Comfort Women'
On June 9, outside of Seoul, 91-year old Bae Chun-hui took her last gasp of air at the House of Sharing , a communal home established for former “comfort women” in South Korea to live out their remaining years in peace. Bae was kidnapped at the age of 19 and taken to Manchuria, where she was forced...
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Tuesday, April 1, 2014 - 12:00pm
Breathless in North Korea
“Please don’t take her,” my sister pleaded with me. “You’ll end up in a prison camp.” She, along with the rest of my family, lobbied forcefully against my bringing my two-year old daughter on a recent peace-building mission to North Korea. Granted, it wasn’t a great time to go to Pyongyang. It was...
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Friday, July 26, 2013 - 12:19pm
After 60 Years of Suffering, Time to Replace Korean Armistice with Peace Treaty
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Friday, October 7, 2011 - 8:26am
Of Bases and Budgets
At 4 am on September 24, an intoxicated U.S. soldier based at Camp Casey in South Korea broke into the dorm of a high school student, threatened her with a weapon and repeatedly sexually assaulted her. Due to the extraterritoriality of the Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) between the South Korean and U.S. governments, Seoul must issue an arrest warrant to the U.S. Forces in Korea (USFK) to transfer the soldier to face Korea’s criminal system.
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Friday, August 19, 2011 - 11:47am
Naval Base Tears Apart Korean Village
“The land and sea isn’t something you bought,” explained Kang Ae-Shim. “Why are you selling something that was there long before you were born?”
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Friday, July 8, 2011 - 3:47pm
Agent Orange in Korea
In May, three former U.S. soldiers admitted to dumping hundreds of barrels of chemical substances, including Agent Orange, at Camp Carroll in South Korea in 1978. This explosive news was a harsh reminder to South Koreans of the high costs and lethal trail left behind by the ongoing U.S. military presence.
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