Fukushima

Kenny Stancil, staff writer
Storage tanks for contaminated water stand at the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 3, 2020 in Okuma, Japan. (Photo: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP via Getty Images)
"The moment that I hear the word 'treated' being used instead of 'contaminated,' I can't think differently than this is a kind of newspeak," said one Greenpeace official.
Andrea Germanos, staff writer
Storage tanks for radioactive water stand at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s (Tepco) Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant on January 29, 2020 in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.
The Japanese government told embassy officials from nearly two dozen countries...
Julia Conley, staff writer
The delay comes days after Japan's government proposed releasing contaminated...

Further

Years later, the site of the Fukushima nuclear disaster remains a post-apocalyptic landscape of empty houses, massive health risks, and 20,000 workers moving bags of lethal soil from one heedless spot to another. Polish photographer Arkadiusz Podniesinski gathered his courage and hazmat suit to searingly document a catastrophe he blames not on earthquake, tsunami or technology, but humans - "an immense experience, not comparable to anything else (where) only the wind answers."

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