Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

For Immediate Release

Contact

Katherine O’Shea at Reprieve US: +1 917 855 8064 / katherine.oshea@reprieve.org  or Donald Campbell at Reprieve UK: donald.campbell@reprieve.org.uk

Press Release

Expected Trials at Guantanamo Fall to New Low – Just 3% of Total Population Since 2002

LONDON -

The US Government has revealed that the number of detainees it expects to be given a trial at Guantanamo has fallen to a new low, with a maximum of just seven more of the remaining 122 people being held at the prison expected to face charges.

Although a total of 779 detainees have been held in Guantanamo since it opened in 2002, just ten of those still at the prison are currently undergoing prosecution or serving sentences handed down by quasi-judicial military commissions. A further eight detainees have been convicted and released, although three of those have since been cleared on appeal.

This means that of the 779 people to have been held at the prison over its lifetime, a maximum of just 25 have faced or are ever expected to face any kind of trial process – that is, just 3%.

Today’s estimate by the US Government – reported by the Miami Herald – also marks a further reduction in the number of detainees it expects to try – a figure which has now been revised down twice since it was set by the Obama Task Force in 2010.

Commenting, Kat Craig, legal director at international human rights NGO Reprieve said: “Today – after many men have been languishing in Guantanamo for over 13 years without charge or trial – we learn that a maximum of just 3% will ever have their case heard. The rest will continue to rot in unbearable conditions – having never been convicted of any crime nor received any vindication. 800 years after Magna Carta established the right to a fair trial, this is a stark reminder of how the most basic principles of justice have been abandoned at Guantanamo.”

###

Reprieve is a UK-based human rights organization that uses the law to enforce the human rights of prisoners, from death row to Guantánamo Bay.

Democrats, Progressive Groups Push DOJ to Publish Database of 'Corporate Lawbreaking'

"The Corporate Crime Database Act will bring transparency to the corporate crime crisis so that the DOJ and other law enforcement agencies can better reckon with this greed-driven menace," said one advocate.

Kenny Stancil ·


As Corporations Enjoy Record-High Profits, Experts Urge Congress to 'Rein Them In'

"Today's record corporate profits mirror what we have been hearing on earnings call after earnings call: Corporations are gleefully reporting that their strategy to burden families with unnecessary price hikes is working."

Brett Wilkins ·


'Egregious': PFAS Firefighting Foam Spills at Notorious Red Hill Naval Facility in Hawaii

While officials said there is no evidence that drinking water was contaminated, the incident generated further local frustration with the closing fuel storage complex.

Jessica Corbett ·


House Passes Paid Sick Leave for Railway Workers Despite Opposition of 207 Republicans

"Now let's get it through the Senate," said Rep. Jamaal Bowman, who led the fight to add seven days of paid sick leave to a White House-brokered contract that failed to provide any to railroad workers.

Kenny Stancil ·


DeSantis-Backed Education Purge Begins After School Board Takeovers in Florida

"The new playbook of total ideological control is in full swing," said one free expression advocate.

Julia Conley ·

Common Dreams Logo