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President Joe Biden touts the American Rescue Plan and Paycheck Protection Program during a February 22, 2021 address at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden touts the American Rescue Plan and Paycheck Protection Program during a February 22, 2021 address at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images) 

US Voters Want Much More Covid-19 Relief—and They Want It Now: Poll

"Simply put, more is required to ensure that we build a more resilient, equal economy that works for more people."

Brett Wilkins

A majority of likely U.S. voters—and especially younger ones and people of color—support immediately spending much more on coronavirus pandemic relief than the nearly $2 trillion in President Joe Biden's American Rescue Plan, a poll published Monday by ProsperUS, the Green New Deal Network, and Data For Progress revealed. 

"This new polling shows that voters across the political spectrum see relief packages passed and government spending up until this point as only a down payment on a full recovery."
—Claire Guzdar, ProsperUS

The survey (pdf) found that 57% of all respondents—including 77% of Democrats, 51% of Independents, and 40% of Republicans—want more pandemic relief passed immediately. Among all likely voters under the age of 45, support for more and immediate relief rose to 66%, while 67% of Black and 60% of Latinx respondents said they want additional stimulus spending now. 

The likely voters were also asked whether they would support a $10 trillion economic recovery package "that includes money to expand and update water, electrical, housing, and transportation infrastructure," as well as "more money for small businesses and manufacturing, and money for care for elderly and disabled people."

Sixty-one percent of all respondents either strongly or somewhat support such a move; when the potential package price tag was reduced to $4 trillion, support rose five points to 66%. Among Democratic voters, 81% backed the $10 trillion proposal, while 83% favored a $4 trillion recovery plan.

Fifty-three percent of Independent voters said they back a $10 trillion stimulus, with 55% strongly or somewhat supporting the $4 trillion option. Among Republican respondents, 44% look favorably upon a $10 trillion recovery package, while half said they support spending $4 trillion.

"This new polling shows that voters across the political spectrum see relief packages passed and government spending up until this point as only a down payment on a full recovery, not the end of the public investment needed to get us out of this crisis and build a stronger, more sustainable economy," ProsperUS campaign manager and spokesperson Claire Guzdar said in a statement.

"An overwhelming majority of voters understand that millions of families and workers are still hurting, and that our path to recovery is still ongoing," said Guzdar. "Young people and people of color—those most affected by the crises we face—are most supportive"

"Simply put," she added, "more is required to ensure that we build a more resilient, equal economy that works for more people."

The poll was conducted from April 21 to April 25. The U.S. government's April jobs report bolstered calls for a $10 trillion infrastructure plan such as the THRIVE Act introduced by progressive lawmakers last month. 


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