Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

If you’ve been waiting for the right time to support our work—that time is now.

Our mission is simple: To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good.

But without the support of our readers, this model does not work and we simply won’t survive. It’s that simple.
We must meet our Mid-Year Campaign goal but we need you now.

Please, support independent journalism today.

Join the small group of generous readers who donate, keeping Common Dreams free for millions of people each year. Without your help, we won’t survive.

Rejecting corporate PAC money and big-dollar fundraisers, Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) have raised $35 million and $46 million, respectively, during the 2020 election so far. Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who criticized the grassroots fundraising strategy Monday, has raised less than both candidates despite accepting corporate funds. (Photo: @ewarren/Twitter; @berniesanders/Twitter)

As Democrats Head to Debate Stage, Buttigieg Attacks Warren and Sanders—Who Have Outearned Him—for Small-Dollar Donations

"This 'pocket change' comment is a good example of how centrist Democrats demobilize the base. It's telling 95 percent of people (those who can't make big donations), 'No, you can't.'"

Julia Conley

A day before 12 candidates in the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates take the stage for the fourth debate of the primary, South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg criticized several of his opponents for their reliance on grassroots, small-dollar fundraising and bold policy proposals—despite the broad popularity and success of both.

On "Good Luck, America," a political news show airing on Snapchat, Buttigieg took aim at Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)—and indirectly at Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)—for raising campaign funds mostly through small individual contributions.

"We're not going to beat Trump with pocket change," Buttigieg told host Peter Hamby.

Critics noted that Sanders and Warren are the top fundraisers of the Democratic primary, raising $46 million and $35 million mainly through small donations.

"Pocket change is beating Pete, though," journalist Krystal Ball tweeted.

Warren frequently posts videos of herself personally calling donors who have given her small amounts of money to thank them—a hallmark of the campaign which has won her praise and which Warren says she's able to do because she isn't spending time at high-dollar fundraisers.

The $32 million Buttigieg has raised is almost evenly split between small and large contributions, with 51 percent coming from large-dollar donations.

Both Sanders and Warren raised more than Buttigieg in the 3rd quarter of 2019, raising $25 million and $24 million, respectively, compared with Buttigieg's $19 million.

Some on social media said Buttigieg's disparaging comments about Warren's and Sanders's strategy could be seen negatively by his own potential small-dollar donors, forcing him to rely even more on large donations—the latter of which the majority of Americans believe should be limited, according to Pew Research.

Buttigieg also took aim at former Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas), who he recently disagreed with about the latter's proposed buy-back program from assault weapons.

"I get it, he needs to pick a fight in order to stay relevant but this is about a difference of opinion on policy," Buttigieg told Hamby.

Beto's statement about buy-backs at the third Democratic debate last month—"Hell, yes, we're going to take your AR-15, your AK-47,"—won loud applause from the audience, but garnered an accusation after the debate from Buttigieg that O'Rourke's proposal was "playing into the hands of Republicans." In response, O'Rourke suggested his opponent was among several who are "triangulating, poll-testing, focus-group driving their response" to questions about how they would govern.

A survey released by The Hill/HarrisX late last month showed broad support for O'Rourke's buy-back proposal. Eighty-seven percent of Democrats supported a voluntary program, while 76 percent of overall respondents backed the proposal. A mandatory program was supported by 59 percent of respondents, including 51 percent of independents and nearly 40 percent of Republicans.

Along with eight other candidates, including former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Buttigieg, Warren, Sanders, and O'Rourke will take part in the fourth Democratic debate on Tuesday night.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

"I'm sure this will be all over the corporate media, right?"
That’s what one longtime Common Dreams reader said yesterday after the newsroom reported on new research showing how corporate price gouging surged to a nearly 70-year high in 2021. While major broadcasters, newspapers, and other outlets continue to carry water for their corporate advertisers when they report on issues like inflation, economic inequality, and the climate emergency, our independence empowers us to provide you stories and perspectives that powerful interests don’t want you to have. But this independence is only possible because of support from readers like you. You make the difference. If our support dries up, so will we. Our crucial Mid-Year Campaign is now underway and we are in emergency mode to make sure we raise the necessary funds so that every day we can bring you the stories that corporate, for-profit outlets ignore and neglect. Please, if you can, support Common Dreams today.

 

'We WILL Fight Back': Outrage, Resolve as Protests Erupt Against SCOTUS Abortion Ruling

Demonstrators took to the streets Friday to defiantly denounce the Supreme Court's right-wing supermajority after it rescinded a constitutional right for the first time in U.S. history.

Brett Wilkins ·


80+ US Prosecutors Vow Not to Be Part of Criminalizing Abortion Care

"Criminalizing and prosecuting individuals who seek or provide abortion care makes a mockery of justice," says a joint statement signed by 84 elected attorneys. "Prosecutors should not be part of that."

Kenny Stancil ·


Progressives Rebuke Dem Leadership as Clyburn Dismisses Death of Roe as 'Anticlimactic'

"The gap between the Democratic leadership, and younger progressives on the question of 'How Bad Is It?' is just enormous."

Julia Conley ·


In 10 Key US Senate Races, Here's How Top Candidates Responded to Roe Ruling

While Republicans unanimously welcomed the Supreme Court's rollback of half a century of reproductive rights, one Democrat said "it's just wrong that my granddaughter will have fewer freedoms than my grandmother did."

Brett Wilkins ·


Sanders Says End Filibuster to Combat 'Outrageous' Supreme Court Assault on Abortion Rights

"If Republicans can end the filibuster to install right-wing judges to overturn Roe v. Wade, Democrats can and must end the filibuster, codify Roe v. Wade, and make abortion legal and safe," said the Vermont senator.

Jake Johnson ·

Common Dreams Logo