Skip to main content

Why are the billionaires always laughing?

Because they know the corporate media will never call bullshit on their bullshit.

Rallies Planned for Cities Nationwide to Back Climate Youth Battling Trump in #TrialoftheCentury

"All of us have a responsibility to double down in supporting the young people holding the U.S. government responsible for perpetuating climate change and threatening our collective future."

Julia Conley

Supporters of 21 children and young adults who are suing the federal government for its failure to protect their generation from the climate crisis are planning to rally in towns and cities across the country on Sunday. (Photo: @youthvgov/Twitter)

Supporters of 21 children and young adults who are suing the federal government will gather in cities and towns across the U.S. in the coming days to urge the justice system to hear the plaintiffs' case.

The plaintiffs in the landmark climate case Juliana vs. the U.S. were planning to bring their case to trial this coming Monday, October 29, after fighting in the courts for three years in order to hold the government accountable for its failure to protect their generation from the climate crisis.

The U.S. Supreme Court took the highly unusual step of issuing a stay on the case at the request of the government—which argued the cost of litigation would be burdensome.

"As the administration pulls out every attempt to delay, deceive, and distract us from what's being considered the trial of the century, it makes you wonder just what they're hiding." —Thanu Yakupitiyage, 350.org

"This lawsuit could change everything, but the federal administration continues to try and silence these courageous youth," said Thanu Yakupitiyage, communications manager for 350.org. "All of us have a responsibility to double down in supporting the young people holding the U.S. government responsible for perpetuating climate change and threatening our collective future."

In response, the young plaintiffs, who are represented by Our Children's Trust, quickly pulled together a 103-page brief "in hopes of receiving a decision from the Chief Justice before the week’s end."

The rallies will be held on Sunday and Monday in cities including Eugene, Oregon, where the trial was scheduled to begin in a U.S. District Court; Washington, D.C.; and New York, with supporters demanding the case be allowed to move forward. A map showing the locations of the events in nearly every state in the nation is available here.

The 21 Juliana v. US youth plaintiffs are suing the federal government for violating their constitutional rights by causing #climatechange. The government continues to try to silence them. Stand in solidarity with these climate heroes on Monday: https://t.co/g2BOsGT4a3 #youthvgov pic.twitter.com/48gym7vyYl

— Our Children's Trust (@youthvgov) October 23, 2018

"As the administration pulls out every attempt to delay, deceive, and distract us from what's being considered the trial of the century, it makes you wonder just what they're hiding," said Yakupitiyage. "That's why thousands of people will rally across the country, demanding these youth voices are heard and that the government act in accordance with our constitutional rights to life, liberty, and property."

The plaintiffs "allege that the U.S. government has knowingly violated their constitutional rights for over 50 years by causing and contributing to climate change," said Our Children's Trust in a call to action.

"On October 29th," the group added, the young people "will march into court—with America standing behind them—to demand a science-based National Climate Recovery Plan: a plan that would end the reign of fossil fuels and require the United States government to do its part to address dangerous climate change for young people and all future generations."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

This is the world we live in. This is the world we cover.

Because of people like you, another world is possible. There are many battles to be won, but we will battle them together—all of us. Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We don't survive on clicks. We don't want advertising dollars. We want the world to be a better place. But we can't do it alone. It doesn't work that way. We need you. If you can help today—because every gift of every size matters—please do. Without Your Support We Simply Don't Exist.

'Bombshell': Total Knew About Climate Threat From Fossil Fuels for Decades, But Denied It

"The dire consequences of climate change we are now experiencing could have been avoided if Total executives 50 years ago had decided that the future of the planet is more important than their profits."

Jessica Corbett ·


Report Details 'Dangerous Trajectory' of Countries' Fossil Fuel Production Plans

"World leaders need to put their resources where their rhetoric has been—stopping the extraction of oil and gas and directing attention to how we will finance the transition to climate justice instead," said one campaigner.

Julia Conley ·


'This Is Sick': Cable Companies Refuse to Air Ad Criticizing Corporate Donors to Florida's Abortion Opponents

"Corporate America protecting itself from being called out for supporting candidates that want to ban abortion in Florida," is how state Rep. Anna Eskamani summarized Comcast and Spectrum's decision.

Kenny Stancil ·


Sanders to Host "What's in the Damn Bill" Online Panel Discussion About Democrats' Package

The Senate Budget Committee chair will be joined by other progressive lawmakers and leaders at 8:00 pm Wednesday.

Common Dreams staff ·


Don't Be Distracted by Possible Facebook Rebrand, Say Critics of Tech Behemoth

"Just to be clear, Facebook, our problem with you is not your name."

Brett Wilkins ·

Support our work.

We are independent, non-profit, advertising-free and 100% reader supported.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values.
Direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to our Newsletter.


Common Dreams, Inc. Founded 1997. Registered 501(c3) Non-Profit | Privacy Policy
Common Dreams Logo